Ragan Military

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Scope note(s)

  • Comprised of nearly 30,000 volumes spanning military history from the American Civil War through and including the Gulf War, but concentrating most heavily on the twentieth century (from the Spanish-American war through the Gulf War). It is strong in areas such as naval and aviation history.

Source note(s)

  • Local, TxAM

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Ragan Military

Equivalent terms

Ragan Military

  • UF Collecting Area

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Ragan Military

85 Archival Descriptions results for Ragan Military

85 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

American Field Service Ambulance Driver Diary

  • US TxAM-C 189
  • Collection
  • 1915

The diary begins at an entry for 19 May 1915 with the driver's departure from Paris, to report to the Bureau, or main Section office of the service, at Pont-á-Mousson, which he often abbreviates to Pont. in diary entries. The diary's driver is often under fire, either while driving the roads among convoys, or in the towns being shelled, and, on a least one occasion, even at his billet, called a caserne. He is also clearly interested in becoming an aviator and visits a French aviation field with a friend from the American Field Service during his time off.

There are descriptions of German prisoners in the town square, serious casualties called couchés, episodes of shelling, the hazards of evacuating casualties under fire, as well as the daily life of an American soldier serving in World War I before the official entrance of the United States, is terse and vivid. The narrative presents an interesting contrast of intense activity and intermittent loafing in the French towns and countryside, including a tour of such battle areas as Bois-le-Prêtre, the site of the First Battle of the Marne.

The diary may have come into Stratemeyer's possession at Kelly Field from an aviator being trained or otherwise based there. Ambulance drivers who served first as volunteers in France seem to have transferred to other branches of the service, in several cases the Air Service, after serving in the American Field Service for possibly only a few months.

The entries end abruptly on June 9, 1915.

The shiny dark brown paper-covered diary measures 17 x 10 cm., with 26 of its 40 blue-ruled pages filled with entries handwritten in ink. Although found inserted into an issue of the Kelly Field eagle published between April 1918 and January 1919 and donated to the repository by General George Stratemeyer, the diary is neither labeled, nor signed, and the entries are dated [May] 19 - June 9, 1915.

A newspaper clipping is slipped into the diary, dated 1873 by hand in ink, probably from a British newspaper, which contains a poem, "To Loch Skene", on which corrections to the text have been made in ink.

It may be noted that George Stratemeyer, probably did not write the diary since he served with the 7th and 34th Infantry divisions in Texas and Arizona until September 1916, immediately after his graduation from the U.S. Military Academy in June 1915. He subsequently became commanding officer of the Air Service Flying and Technical Schools at Kelly Field, Texas in May 1917. The diary may have come into Stratemeyer's possession at Kelly Field from an aviator being trained or otherwise based there.

The 25-page paper transcript was made in February 2002 by Aletha Andrew, who processed the collection in the repository.

Ambulance Driver

Andy Marmaduke Jones, Jr. World War II Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 1060
  • Collection
  • 1941-1949; 1992; Undated

This collection consists of copies made from the originals of correspondence, news articles, photographs, and other materials pertaining to Andy M. James, Jr.'s time serving in World War II (WWII).

B. B. Baker Collection

  • US TxAM-C 1187
  • Collection
  • 1942-1954; undated

This collection contains correspondence, pictures, clippings, documents, notes, certificates, awards, and other materials concerning the military career of Air Force Lieutenant B. B. Baker and those with whom he worked. The materials span the time period of World War II as well as military operations and concerns in India, China, and Southeast Asia in the years following the war.

The largest section of correspondence is the letters between Lt. Baker and his parents dating from December 1942 to May 1954. Other correspondence includes those between Lt. Baker and others including Generals with whom Baker was associated.

Within the numerous military certificates awarded to Lieutenant Baker, there is an atomic illustration (joke certificate of atomic testing and WWII humor), a letter of gratitude from Harry Truman, and an Army certificate of appreciation for war service. Also included in the collection are military flying handouts, Marines football game photos, and other information about the WWII accounts in Baker's life. Other photographs include some of India in 1943 and 1944 as well as the Imperial Palace in Japan (folder 2/5). There is also a scrapbook containing newspaper articles concerning Asia along with notes on the region (folder 2/9).

Baker, B. B.

B. H. Amstead Collection

  • US TxAM-C 1596
  • Collection
  • 1945-1957

This collection contains materials related to the U.S.S. Amphion such as memorandums, Plans of the Day, and invitations to the commissioning. Also included are 45 slides with views of multiple ships, planes, and other images. Ships included are USS Kearsarge (CVA-33), USS Essex (CVA-9), USS Hancock (CVA-19), USS Cavalier (APA-37), USS Hassayampa (AO-145), USS Kidd (DD-661), USS Bradford (DD-545), USS Uhlmann (DD-687), and USS Agerholm (DD-826) among a few others.

Barbara N. Stone World War II Scrapbook

  • US TxAM-C 1412
  • Collection

This scrapbook was assembled by Dr. Barbara N. Stone during World War II (WWII). It primarily focuses on President Roosevelt but also contains homefront articles.

Belcher Family History Collection

  • US TxAM-C 1579
  • Collection

This collection contains mostly photocopies of documents with information pertaining to the Belcher Family, specifically John Bell Belcher (1840-1901) and his time during the Civil War. Also included is a photograph of Belcher's tombstone, War Ration book, and a newspaper clipping from the San Antonio Express.

Benjamin M. Linsley Letters

  • US TxAM-C 156
  • Collection
  • 1862-1863

These six letters, dated December 12, 1862 - August 6, 1863, are from Benjamin M. Linsley to his friend Mrs. Lucy G. Palmer in Suffield, Conn. Each letter is written in ink on both sides of a single folded sheet, except for the first one, which is on two folded sheets, sewn together in the center with cloth thread at some point after they were composed. All are addressed by Linsley from the camp near Falmouth, Va., where his regiment, the 14th Infantry of the Army of the Potomac was based, except the last one, which is addressed from McKinnis Hospital in Baltimore, Md., where Linsley was sent to recover from typhoid fever.

In the letters, Linsley comments on the failure of the Union army to obtain substantial victories ever since the Union defeat at Fredericksburg; inflated prices for postage stamps and sutler's goods; the despair he feels at the poor treatment in general of the sick in military hospitals, not only by medical personnel but by fellow soldiers; strategies for obtaining better food and bedding for his brother while nursing him through a severe fever, probably typhoid; the need for statesmen of moral standing more like George Washington than the much clamoured for "little man" George MacClellan; the trials of long marches in either rain and mud to cross the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers, only to retreat back over them after the battle of Chancellorsville, or the intense heat of marches toward Warrenton Junction, Va., from which Linsley was transported with the sick and wounded to recover from typhoid himself in McKinnis Hospital at Baltimore; the desperation of deserters being taken to their punishment; the immoral behaviour of men in camp; the need for more good chaplains like Clay Trumbull of Hartford, Conn., who served with his brother's regiment of Volunteers; and perhaps, more poignantly, the eerie sound of drums during funerals for the many soldiers who died in camp from sickness in their poor living conditions.

The letters are now each encased in a clear plastic sleeve. A one-page report from the National Archives and Records Administration is included with the first letter. This NARA report (2 July 2001) replies to a request made by Professor Dale Baum of Texas A & M University in April 2001 to locate and make a copy of Benjamin M. Linsley's pension documents packet, stating NARA staff could not locate the materials. Baum had listed Linsley as an enlistee of the U.S. Army in Company A, 1st Battalion, 14th U.S. Infantry.

Linsley, Benjamin M.

Bill Fulton Manuscript, "Mines, Mortars, Matching Guns and Riflemen"

  • TxAM-CRS 1066
  • Collection
  • 1988-1992; Undated

This collection contains a copy of Fulton's manuscript "Mines, Mortars, Matching Guns and Riflemen", along with correspondence to a few individuals and between others regarding the manuscript and its contents.

Brazos Valley Veterans Memorial Records

  • TxAM-CRS C000296
  • Collection

This collection contains plans, correspondence, video, minutes, photographs, and research files from the Brazos Valley Veterans Board for the Brazos Valley Veterans Memorial, located at Veterans Park in College Station, Texas.

C. Walt Brown World War II Air Crew Training Division Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 1061
  • Collection
  • 1905-1946; Undated

This collection consists of letters (mostly to his mother and family between 1943-1944), newspaper clippings, and a few other materials detailing the life of Charles Walt Brown during his tenure in the US Army Air Force, especially his experiences while in the Air Crew Training Division on the Texas A&M campus.

From 1943 to 1944, Texas A&M College provided its land and facilities to the US Military to prepare soldiers for World War II (WWII). In Brown's letter to his mother, Mary Swan, and to other family members, he told of details of his life in the Army and at the different military facilities he was stationed at.

Charles B. Richardson Collection

  • US TxAM-C 1317
  • Collection
  • 1840-1959

This collection contains various articles, newspaper clippings, and other memorabilia collected by Charles B. Richardson over his lifetime. Interesting pieces in the collection include Richardson's letter of promotion to Captain of the Louisiana militia (1848), newspaper clippings concerning various Civil War events, and a poster advertising agricultural combines dating from the mid-1870s. Another interesting piece in the collection is a payment receipt from October 26, 1863, for the services of a slave named Mike who worked on public defenses in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Richardson, Charles B.

Colonel C. J. Crane Collection

  • US TxAM-C 1158
  • Collection
  • 1900-1905; Undated

This collection contains many photographs and other items pertaining to Crane's military service in the Spanish-American War. The collection also contains his personal items and a biography.

Crane, Charles Judson, 1852-1928

Colonel Dorris A. Hanes Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 112
  • Collection
  • 1942-1943

These papers also contain an audit of the Stanley Warehouse. Photographs also include interior and exterior shots of Stanley Warehouse and additional photos of military personnel.

Of special note are photographs of a visit to inspect the facilities and visit troops by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. There are two photographs of Mrs. Roosevelt, accompanied by Colonel Dorris A. Hanes, speaking with African American soldiers.

A photographer identified as Ingledew in Liverpool, England, in 1942, took a majority of the photographs and many have a series of numbers written on the back. Many of the photographs identify individual soldiers by name and their hometowns. Hometowns include Chicago and Springfield, Illinois, Winthrop, Massachusetts, Passaic, New Jersey, New York City, Cuero and San Antonio, Texas, and West Virginia.

Note that although photographs of Eleanor Roosevelt have her name spelled incorrectly, the finding aid uses the correct spelling. Other names are spelled one way on the back of the photograph and differently in the front captions. Information about photos is typed on the back and handwritten on the front. Finding aid attempts to duplicate information as written including grammatical and punctuation errors. The exception is in the inconsistent and confusing use of primarily upper case letters. An attempt was made to make this more uniform in the finding aid by using both upper and lower case letters.

Hanes, Dorris

D. Hobart Taylor Diary

  • US TxAM-C 390
  • Collection
  • 1862

This collection contains the original handwritten diary of D. Hobart Taylor from January 1 to May 30, 1862. Taylor was a northern soldier during the Civil War. Also included in a transcription of the diary.

Daughters of the American Colonists, Governors Chapter Scrapbook

  • TxAM-CRS 1071
  • Collection
  • 1977-1987

This collection contains materials that were originally housed in a 3-ring binder that served as a scrapbook for the Governors Chapter of the Texas Society Daughters of American Colonists. Materials include Chapter and Texas State yearbooks, newspaper clippings, correspondence, and photographs.

Governors Chapter, NCSDAC

Daughters of the American Revolution, William Scott Chapter Yearbooks

  • TxAM-CRS 1073
  • Collection
  • 1949-1989

This collection consists of yearbooks from the Daughters of The American Revolution (DAR) Texas Society's William Scott Chapter in Bryan, Texas. Each yearbook beginning with 1949-1950, covers the fall and following spring. From 1967 to 1977 the yearbooks covered a two-year period with some containing an Addenda yearbook. Within most of the yearbooks, handwritten notes can be found along with a news clipping or two, membership cards, and receipts for membership dues. On covers of many of the yearbooks. Bylaws from 1951 and 1981 are also included along with two yearbooks from the Robert Henry Chapter of Bryan, Texas.

William Scott Chapter, NSDAR

Diaries of a World War I (WWI) 13th Rajputs Regiment Officer

  • TxAM-CRS 927
  • Collection
  • 1914-1919

This collection consists of three diaries written by an officer from the 13th Rajputs regiment during World War I from various locations.

Description from the bookseller:

A trio of diaries written during the Great War in various locations by an officer from the 13th Rajputs regiment. Although the entries do not allow us to go as far as deducing the identity of the author (or his precise rank), they do provide some insight into the conditions and challenges faced as the War spread to remote territories: the first diary is written from Uganda, whilst the second begins dramatically with the fall of Kut-al-Amara and capture by the Ottoman forces with a 2-page, unpublished poem "A Prisoner of War in Yozgad (Asia Minor)", followed by a short, incomplete and entirely bleak piece of prose entitled "Regret" at the rear; the third returns him to Europe, the hand a little less sure and frequent reference to his own poor health, with a broad overview of events both personal and public around the continent - the Paris Peace Conference, the deaths and marriages of his close friends (including his attendance at the wedding of Cynthia Hamilton and Lord Althorp).

The writing is frequently amusing, and there is more complaining about food and living conditions than there is description of fighting; itself an elucidative encapsulation of the day-to-day experience of war.

Don Bosworth Letters

  • US TxAM-C 98
  • Collection
  • 1919

This collection consists of twelve letters handwritten in black ink on both sides of thirteen pages of blue-lined paper with an envelope. The letters are arranged into two series. At the center of the top of the paper are printed the words "Nation War Work Council of the Young Men's Christian Association," each side of which is decorated with an American Flag and the symbol of the YMCA printed in red and dark blue ink. Each page, measuring 27 cm. x 15 cm., is now housed in a transparent plastic folder. On the upper-right side of the envelope are handwritten words "Sailor's Mail". The addressee written on the envelope is Mrs. J.E. Bosworth, who lived on 141 Midland Ave. in Syracuse, New York. However, the letters are addressed to "Dear Folks." Bosworth seems to have bought the envelope before he wrote the letters because his letters begin on June 16, 1919, but the date stamped in blue ink on the envelope is June 14, 1919. In his letters, Bosworth very often does not write the first singular pronoun "I" and uses "&" in preference to the word "and." He crosses out with one or two lines on the words he writes incorrectly. He provides some hand-drawn maps and pictures. He frequently mentions numbers to detail his stories. Of interest is that he comments on the characteristics of the Bolsheviks. He also mentions that he hopes to fight them because he has had no chance to hear gunshots, except in practice.

Bosworth, Don

Edward Everett Papers

  • US TxAM-C C000024
  • Collection
  • 1846-1906

This collection dating from 1846 to 1906 (bulk: 1846-1847) consists chiefly of handwritten letters, journal entries, a memoir, a proof copy of a report from the U. S. Secretary of War on Army operations in Texas and on the Rio Grande during the Mexican War (1846-1848), as well as plans, maps and nine hand-colored copies of lithographic engravings drawn by Everett, which vividly chronicle southwest Texas cultural as well as military history during the late1840s.

Series 1, Letters (1847-1863), mainly handwritten in ink by Edward Everett to his brother, Samuel W. Everett, from 1846-1847, while Everett was serving in San Antonio de Bexar with the U. S. Army during the Mexican War. A few letters from other correspondents pertain to Everett's disability and eventual official discharge from the Army. Three letters written in the period 1852-1863 are about business or from family members.

Series 2, Journal and Memoir (1846-1899) contains three sets of journal entries for Sept. 1846-Jan. 1847. All are handwritten in ink on loose sheets of paper. The memoir, also handwritten in ink, on machine-ruled paper measuring about 8 x 5 inches, covers the years 1846-1848, with additional material added and dated, on at least one page, with 1899. This memoir is edited in pencil by Everett, evidently for publication, since one note suggests that the memoir was donated in 1899 to the Quincy Historical Society, later known as The Illinois Historical Society. The memoir was actually published, at least part, or possibly all of it, under the title "Military Experience," in Transactions of the Illinois Historical Society for 1905.

Series 3, Engravings, Maps, and Plans (ca. 1846-1849) includes nine copies of lithographed illustrations drawn by Edward Everett and engraved by C. B Graham Lithographers in Washington, D.C. The engravings were to be published in a report on U.S. Army operations in Texas during the Mexican War. A proof copy of this 67-page report, titled Report of the Secretary of War, communicating ... the Operations of the Army of the United States in Texas and the Adjacent Mexican states on the Rio Grande (31st Congress, 1st Session, Senate. Executive Document 32), published in 1850, is annotated throughout by Everett in pencil. For this publication Everett was at least responsible for eight illustrations: seven engravings of the San Antonio de Bexar area, including the Alamo church, as well as locations in Mexico; a plan of the ruined Alamo as it was in 1846, before being renovated according to Everett's direction, as a U. S. Army supply depot and workshops.

Engravings include nine copies of the lithographed prints. Notations made in ink on the separate prints, and on p. [4] of the proof copy of the published government report, indicate that: illustrations numbered for publication 2, 3-6 were engraved from original drawings made by Everett; those numbered 1, 7-8 were engraved from drawings made by Everett based on pencil sketches by other individuals, particularly no. 1 titled "Watch Tower Near Monclova," which was drawn by Everett from a sketch by Lieutenant McDowell of the U.S. Army.

Everett's proofs of the lithographic prints have all been exquisitely hand-tinted, in contrast to the severe black-and-white reproductions in the printed report. Of the nine hand-colored prints, two are duplicates of two illustrations, one titled "Church Near Monclova," and the other "Watch Tower Near Monclova." These identical prints are each hand-colored in two versions, apparently to represent the depicted buildings' appearances during the daytime, as well as at dusk or sunset.

Maps include one copy of a published map, possibly also by Everett, though it has been attributed to Josiah Gregg, which also appeared in the 1850 Army Operations report, titled "Map Showing the Route of the Arkansas Regiment from Shreveport La. to San Antonio de Bexar Texas," which is annotated with a penciled in route drawn from San Antonio to Austin, and a town location labeled "New Braunsfels." Also included are two manuscript versions of a map by Edward Everett, one copy titled "Plan of the Vicinity of Austin and San Antonio, Texas."

Plans are represented by two copies of an illustration drawn by Everett for the 1849 Army operations report showing plans of the Alamo before the renovation, titled "Plans of the Ruins of the Alamo near San Antonio De Bexar, 1846." Also present is one manuscript plan, titled "Plan of San Antonio de Bexar, Texas, 1848," which is labeled as "Drawn from recollection by E. E." The legend states that locations number 1-5 on the plan show, for instance, the spot near the Plaza in town where Everett received his disabling gunshot wound in the leg, the Hospital where he convalesced, and the Quartermaster's Office, to which he was assigned to work after being declared disabled from active service in the field.

A handwritten loose-leaf page kept with the proof copy of the report is titled "Index to Col. Hughes Report," and lists subject divisions and page numbers, though these divisions are not present in the published report by Hughes.

Thus Everett's accounts of frontline actions in the Mexican War mainly rely on reports from occasional volunteer soldiers or scouts, or Mexican nationals, returning back to Texas from the front lines of battle in Mexico. As much as he is able, however, Everett produces very detailed accounts of the various battles and skirmishes in and around the Texas-Mexico border, including battles at Monterrey, Saltillo, San Luis, Camargo, Buena Vista, Vera Cruz, and Tampico, recording a large number of casualties on both sides.

Of particular interest is Everett's extensive first-hand description of the ruins of the Alamo, and how it was converted for U.S. Army use as a military headquarters, according to plans drawn up by Everett. He deplores the vandalism already wreaked by relic seekers and stressed the respect shown to the mission church by the U. S. Army restorers, who refused to plunder it for building stone but instead merely cleaned away the debris. In the process, skeletons were uncovered, which Everett assumes to be from the time of the siege and Battle of the Alamo in 1836. Everett's accounts of frontier life in the rather rambunctious confines of San Antonio, complete with ambushes, shootouts, rough and ready court trials, and various local characters are often riveting.

Everett also pictures the moods and attitudes of the soldiers toward a variety of issues. Everett describes their arduous marches, unsavory living conditions, often dire medical care, and the cruel climate tormenting them. Having been left behind in San Antonio with all the stores rejected by the army, which had proceeded on into Mexico, Everett's men were faced with nursing broken down mules and horses back to usefulness, salvaging wagon parts from several damaged ones to make a serviceable one, and generally, trying to make do with what could be had in the vicinity, or easily transported from the Quartermaster at New Orleans.

According to Everett, communications on the Texas frontier often proceeded through "solitary express riders." He describes Mexican culture co-existing with "the Indians" and their horse-stealing. He also gives an excellent but pejorative account of the Texas Rangers and their activities, calling them desperados. Everett describes Mexican Generals Santa Anna, Torrejón, and Woll, the exceedingly unpopular U. S. Army Colonel Churchill, officers George W. Hughes, 1st Lieutenant W. B. Franklin, 2nd Lieutenant F. T. Bryan, General Zachary Taylor ("Old Rough and Ready"), General Winfield Scott, and General James Morgan, Captain J. H. Prentiss, Brigadier General John E. Wool, Major General Worth, Captain James Harvey Ralston, Captain L. Sitgreaves, as well as Edward Everett's own two brothers Charles Everett and Samuel W. Everett (Sam).

Full of absorbing narrative and elusive details often lost in larger historical works, the content of Everett's narratives and letters may be summed up in his own words from the handwritten memoir: "Mine is not a tale of battles, or of the movements of great armies, but the details will show some of the hardships and vicissitudes of a soldier's life, the exposure to which causes a greater sacrifice of life than that ensuing from wounds of death received from the enemy."

Everett, Edward

Execution Orders for Japanese Prisoners

  • US TxAM-C 1586
  • Collection
  • 1948

This collection contains the execution order of Japanese prisoners dated August 17, 1948. (typed, 2 leaves).

Felix J. Stalls World War I Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 396
  • Collection
  • 1917-1919

This collection contains the paper of Stalls regarding his military service in the 359th Infantry during World War I. Included are 71 letters and cards mostly to his parents, 17 photographs, a copy of the speech given by Major Tom G. Woolen to the 2nd battalion 359th Infantry on November 11, 1918, a chronology of the activities of the 359th Infantry, and a copy of A Short History and Photographic Record of the 359th Infantry Texas Brigade by Lieutenant Colonel W. A. Cavenaugh (1918(.

First World War Christmas Truce of 1914 (Clippingdale) Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000077
  • Collection
  • 1914-1915

Series of autograph letters and cards, by No. 8865 Lance Corporal Gordon Clippingdale ('Clip') of the 5th Battalion, City of London Rifles, to his wife Bridget of 141 Willesden Lane, London NW, comprising over 50 autograph letters, postcards and pre-printed sickness forms, the first fourteen written when in training and travelling out to Belgium, the remainder either from the front or while convalescing in hospital in Rouen, giving a graphic account of life in the trenches in the first few months of the war: "The country is absolutely laid waste & yet a fair number of the inhabitants remain, though there is scarcely a whole window left in the village. The place rocks continuously from the explosion of our guns firing but we sleep calmly through it all, being quite used to it by now. The mud is even worse than the frost, being liquid & well up to the knee, our putties & boots being nearly rotted to pieces" (30 November 1914); the series containing some outspoken observations that seem to have escaped the censor's eye: "It makes me wild to see in the papers, so many thousand witnesses to Football match between so & so. Bah. And over here, its work day & night week in week out, ruined churches & villages, fields ploughed by shells, harvests trampled in, homeless people & killing going on day by day. And at home they wear a little flag in their coat & say 'Another victory' or 'No further news', but little they trouble that every day some poor devil goes to his last rest" (3 December 1914); with two letters written during the Christmas Truce (see note below); the earlier letters, written when in training, also showing an eye for sharp observation and the unexpected: "Suddenly we came to a little green lane upon the right, facing an ancient inn & across the end of the lane were standing a row of men in brilliant uniforms & at the end of the line the King in a dark uniform looking very ill & tired out" (20 September 1914); together with a group of photographs, his certificates of birth (8 April 1885) and death (15 June 1955), and letters of consolation to his widow from work colleagues at B.A. Smith & Sons, Chartered Accountants, and LRB veterans, some 100 pages, both Christmas Truce letters of one page each, written on small folio letter-forms (c.240 x 150 mm.), with address, censor's signature and postmarks on the verso (date-stamped by the Army Post Office 30 December and 5 January), the rest of the letters and cards bearing censors' signatures, stamps, postmarks etc., some minor creasing and contemporaneous staining etc., but overall in good attractive condition, 4to, 8vo and on postcards, 31 August 1914 to 17 February 1915 -- Bonham's Lot 169" - bookseller's description.

General Walter Krueger Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 160
  • Collection
  • 1943-1945

This collection includes copies of administrative orders, field orders, and weekly reports compiled by the staff of the Sixth Army and sent to General Krueger, as well as copies of operation reports sent from General Krueger to the Adjutant General in Washington, D. C. Also included are after-action operation reports concerning the 6th Army.

The administrative orders primarily contain data or amendments to accompany Field Orders and are concerned with supply, evacuation, traffic, service troops, personnel, prisoners of war, and miscellaneous items. Also included are instructions and annexes dealing with captured enemy equipment, individual clothing and equipment, supply, burials and cemeteries, native labor, sanitation, prisoners of war and enemy dead, captured material trophies, air supply circulars, and plans of operation. Maps and sketches are also found among the administrative orders.

The field orders contain data and instructions relating to hostile dispositions and support of operations, task forces, command posts, supplies, and communications. Also included are annexes concerned with staging, loading and embarkation plans, intelligence, artillery and antiaircraft artillery, communications, and engineering. Maps, sketches, and code names are also included in the field orders.

The weekly reports contain intelligence information on enemy activities, terrain, counterintelligence, material and equipment, captured documents and POW interrogations, reclassification of documents, enemy tactics, psychological warfare, and code names and numbers. Also included are photographic coverage reports, sketches, and maps.

The operation reports provide the history of the operation, including organization and operating instructions, plans and preparations, background and terrain, reconnaissance, communication, operations, enemy reaction, engineer activities, captured materials, relations with natives, the recapitulation of casualties, commendations, awards, and decorations, conclusions, credit for success, and lessons learned.

Krueger, Walter, 1881-1967

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