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Texas A&M University, Libraries, Cushing Memorial Library & Archives
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A. A. "Al" Jackson Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000154
  • Collection
  • 1956-1977

This collection contains the manuscript of Pause for Reflection (Superradiance) in three copies (n.a. Pause for Reflection, by A. A. Jackson IV and Howard Waldrop).

Jackson, A.A.

Alex Haley Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000012
  • Collection
  • 1949-1965, 1967, 1991

This collection consists of one box of material that includes heavily edited and complete manuscript pages from the Autobiography of Malcolm X, his writings on Mahalia Jackson, Wilma Rudolph, the story Queenie, a follow-up to Roots, and other writings. Also included are his notes regarding the re-run of the mini-series Roots. He mentions a meeting he had with Warren Beatty where they discussed Roots. The notes are titled "Re: Roots Re-Run for TV Guide. Between the Covers acquired the collection from a bookseller who bought it directly from the estate of Virginia Hannon. A group of early letters from Alex Haley it's seven letters sent between 1949-1954 (one from 1967) to close family friend, Virginia Hannon. The letters present Haley, then a journalist in the Coast Guard, trying to get his writing career started and relating thoughts about his working habits, carious siblings, and plans for the future. All letters are written light, optimistic, and sometimes flirtatious style. Accompanying them are several related photographs, including one of Hannon in uniform, and a copy of Haley's posthumous novel Queen inscribed to her by his brother, George.

The July 2015 addendum includes an archive of seven Typed Letters Signed from Alex Haley sent between 1949-1954 (with one from 1967) to a close family friend, along with related photographs and the first edition of Queen Inscribed by his brother George Haley. The letters are overall near fine with typical folds from being mailing and light toning, with their original mailing envelopes that show wear including are nick, tears, and chip, but all are present; the photos are fine. The book is fine in a fine dustwrapper.

The letters, which are signed both as "Alex" and "Palmer," his middle name, were written to Virginia Hannon, a woman who taught Alex Haley French at Alcorn College before he left to join the Coast Guard. The letters begin after he's become a journalist writing for Coast Guard Magazine, and it seems, after an absence from Hannon. The letters are very familiar and playful with references to her French class, updates on his brothers George and Julius, and although married, some flirtatious comments about her breasts, "they were not as you say, spinsterly," and his faraway demeanor in class, "believe me, love, I was not, when you observed me, thinking about any damned touchdowns." There is also lots of talk about Haley's writing career. The early letters from 1949 included his thoughts on his drive to be a writer: "I'm trying pretty hard and have thus far had some minor successes," as well as his bad habits: "I'm essentially lazy, but I love to write once I get started." It's during an extended hospital stay for the treatment of a pilonidal cyst in 1953 that he seems to really make headway: "I never had so much time on end to write in my life. I have to stand up to type, to be sure, but - boy, am I turning out the words! Things I've wanted to work on for ages." In a letter the next year he excitedly describes what was his first big career break: "The prime accomplishment to date, a milestone in my life, I guess, was the sale two weeks ago, of 'The Harlem that Nobody Knows,' a 4,000-word piece, to Reader's Digest ... As a result, I, last week, got taken in the stable of Ruth Aley, probably one of the top 5 literary agents in the country. I am working like a bastard, to put it bluntly." The job led to a series of articles in the magazine and an assignment with Playboy interviewing many of the most important African-Americans of the day. The final letter from 1967 takes the form of two short but sweet holograph notes to Hannon written on the margins of a form letter and a photocopied travel article. They show a busy, successful writer still trying to keep in touch with an old friend.

The letters are accompanied by a black and white photograph of a young Hannon in a military uniform (possibly Red Cross), along with two later color photos of George with Wynelle [Hannon's sister] and George with President Bill Clinton. Plus, there is a copy of Haley's book Queen, published posthumously, and warmly Inscribed by George: "To my dear sister, Virginia Rose Hannon With love, respect and appreciation Your brother George Haley - and all the rest of the Haley Family 12 June 1993." An interesting and intimate collection of early correspondence from one of the most influential African-American writers of the 20th Century.

Haley, Alex

Alexei Panshin Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000189
  • Collection
  • 1968-1973

This collection consists of several manuscripts of Panshin's work, including his 1968 novel The Thurb Revolution and his serialized novel The Son of Black Morca (1973, photocopies). Also included is a set of galleys for Panshin's Masque World (1969).

Panshin, Alexei

Alfred Elton Van Vogt Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000180
  • Collection
  • 1949-1956; Undated

This collection consists of materials relating to the 1956 A. E. Van Vogt novel Empire of the Atom, including the original typescript, galleys, and correspondence related to the book's publication and review.

Van Vogt, A. E. (Alfred Elton), 1912-2000

Anne McCaffrey Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000197
  • Collection
  • 1969

This collection consists of the original manuscript for McCaffrey's novella The Partnered Ship (1969), which was included as the concluding chapter in her famed 1969 novel The Ship Who Sang. The manuscript (typed 70 leaves) is signed by McCaffrey and has multiple handwritten edits.

McCaffrey, Anne

Anthony Burgess Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000010
  • Collection
  • 1976-1979

The Burgess Collection consists of the first draft of the unpublished novel Puma, written in 1976 as a film treatment that was never made into a film. The novel is accompanied by a letter of explanation from Brian Kirby to Jim O'Roark, February 7, 1979.

Portions of the novel, which was pitched as an update of the classic film When Worlds Collide and which would have told the story of a planet [named "Puma"] hurtling towards Earth, was later adapted by Burgess into his 1982 novel The End of the World News.

Burgess, Anthony, 1917-1993

Association of Former Students (AFS) Proclamations

  • US TxAM-C 116
  • Collection

This collection contains proclamations issued by The Association of Former Students in recognition of the outstanding contributions of Texas A&M former students.

The Association of Former Students

Bernard Gordon Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000170
  • Collection
  • 1963-01-17

This collection consists of a domestic version of the export script dated January 17, 1963, for the British science fiction movie The Day of the Triffids (1962), written by Gordon and based on the famous 1951 novel by John Wyndham.

Gordon, Bernard

Charles Criner Papers and Art Collection

  • US TxAM-C 228
  • Collection
  • 1960-2009

This collection documents Criner's professional and personal life as an artist and educator. The collection includes correspondence, original works of art, prints, drawings, exhibition photos, postcards, writings, photographs, publicity, news clippings, interviews with Criner, and thank you letters and cards from students and visitors who have been taught the art of printmaking and provided tours of the Museum of Printing History in Houston by Criner. The collection includes a number of Criner's prints and copies of his art reproduced as advertisements, exhibits, and prints. Of particular note are the significant examples of Criner’s various cartoons, Johnny Jones, The Job Crowd, The Dogs, and a few others. These were all produced from his stint in the Army, his work with the Houston Post, Houston Chronicle, HUD, and his collaboration with William Henry Hygh. 

A listing of Criner’s artwork and cartoons is included at the end of the finding guide. The collection includes examples of each of these works either in print, photos, or exhibit material.

Criner, Charles

Charles Levy Civil Rights Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000013
  • Collection
  • 1863-1975

This collection contains nearly 1000 items related to the civil rights movement from 1955-1975. The early part of this collection (1955-67) formed the basic research for Levy's book Voluntary Servitude, Whites in the Negro Movement, (New York: Appleton-Century, 1968). The collection includes hundreds of pages of writings, publications, bulletins, internal memos, broadsides, hand-printed magazines, etc. Prominent figures of the civil rights and revolutionary movements, organizations, and committees are covered in the collection. The collection also includes two photographs of President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act with Rev. Martin L. King, Jr. and other luminaries of the civil rights movement.

Edward Everett Papers

  • US TxAM-C C000024
  • Collection
  • 1846-1906

This collection dating from 1846 to 1906 (bulk: 1846-1847) consists chiefly of handwritten letters, journal entries, a memoir, a proof copy of a report from the U. S. Secretary of War on Army operations in Texas and on the Rio Grande during the Mexican War (1846-1848), as well as plans, maps and nine hand-colored copies of lithographic engravings drawn by Everett, which vividly chronicle southwest Texas cultural as well as military history during the late1840s.

Series 1, Letters (1847-1863), mainly handwritten in ink by Edward Everett to his brother, Samuel W. Everett, from 1846-1847, while Everett was serving in San Antonio de Bexar with the U. S. Army during the Mexican War. A few letters from other correspondents pertain to Everett's disability and eventual official discharge from the Army. Three letters written in the period 1852-1863 are about business or from family members.

Series 2, Journal and Memoir (1846-1899) contains three sets of journal entries for Sept. 1846-Jan. 1847. All are handwritten in ink on loose sheets of paper. The memoir, also handwritten in ink, on machine-ruled paper measuring about 8 x 5 inches, covers the years 1846-1848, with additional material added and dated, on at least one page, with 1899. This memoir is edited in pencil by Everett, evidently for publication, since one note suggests that the memoir was donated in 1899 to the Quincy Historical Society, later known as The Illinois Historical Society. The memoir was actually published, at least part, or possibly all of it, under the title "Military Experience," in Transactions of the Illinois Historical Society for 1905.

Series 3, Engravings, Maps, and Plans (ca. 1846-1849) includes nine copies of lithographed illustrations drawn by Edward Everett and engraved by C. B Graham Lithographers in Washington, D.C. The engravings were to be published in a report on U.S. Army operations in Texas during the Mexican War. A proof copy of this 67-page report, titled Report of the Secretary of War, communicating ... the Operations of the Army of the United States in Texas and the Adjacent Mexican states on the Rio Grande (31st Congress, 1st Session, Senate. Executive Document 32), published in 1850, is annotated throughout by Everett in pencil. For this publication Everett was at least responsible for eight illustrations: seven engravings of the San Antonio de Bexar area, including the Alamo church, as well as locations in Mexico; a plan of the ruined Alamo as it was in 1846, before being renovated according to Everett's direction, as a U. S. Army supply depot and workshops.

Engravings include nine copies of the lithographed prints. Notations made in ink on the separate prints, and on p. [4] of the proof copy of the published government report, indicate that: illustrations numbered for publication 2, 3-6 were engraved from original drawings made by Everett; those numbered 1, 7-8 were engraved from drawings made by Everett based on pencil sketches by other individuals, particularly no. 1 titled "Watch Tower Near Monclova," which was drawn by Everett from a sketch by Lieutenant McDowell of the U.S. Army.

Everett's proofs of the lithographic prints have all been exquisitely hand-tinted, in contrast to the severe black-and-white reproductions in the printed report. Of the nine hand-colored prints, two are duplicates of two illustrations, one titled "Church Near Monclova," and the other "Watch Tower Near Monclova." These identical prints are each hand-colored in two versions, apparently to represent the depicted buildings' appearances during the daytime, as well as at dusk or sunset.

Maps include one copy of a published map, possibly also by Everett, though it has been attributed to Josiah Gregg, which also appeared in the 1850 Army Operations report, titled "Map Showing the Route of the Arkansas Regiment from Shreveport La. to San Antonio de Bexar Texas," which is annotated with a penciled in route drawn from San Antonio to Austin, and a town location labeled "New Braunsfels." Also included are two manuscript versions of a map by Edward Everett, one copy titled "Plan of the Vicinity of Austin and San Antonio, Texas."

Plans are represented by two copies of an illustration drawn by Everett for the 1849 Army operations report showing plans of the Alamo before the renovation, titled "Plans of the Ruins of the Alamo near San Antonio De Bexar, 1846." Also present is one manuscript plan, titled "Plan of San Antonio de Bexar, Texas, 1848," which is labeled as "Drawn from recollection by E. E." The legend states that locations number 1-5 on the plan show, for instance, the spot near the Plaza in town where Everett received his disabling gunshot wound in the leg, the Hospital where he convalesced, and the Quartermaster's Office, to which he was assigned to work after being declared disabled from active service in the field.

A handwritten loose-leaf page kept with the proof copy of the report is titled "Index to Col. Hughes Report," and lists subject divisions and page numbers, though these divisions are not present in the published report by Hughes.

Thus Everett's accounts of frontline actions in the Mexican War mainly rely on reports from occasional volunteer soldiers or scouts, or Mexican nationals, returning back to Texas from the front lines of battle in Mexico. As much as he is able, however, Everett produces very detailed accounts of the various battles and skirmishes in and around the Texas-Mexico border, including battles at Monterrey, Saltillo, San Luis, Camargo, Buena Vista, Vera Cruz, and Tampico, recording a large number of casualties on both sides.

Of particular interest is Everett's extensive first-hand description of the ruins of the Alamo, and how it was converted for U.S. Army use as a military headquarters, according to plans drawn up by Everett. He deplores the vandalism already wreaked by relic seekers and stressed the respect shown to the mission church by the U. S. Army restorers, who refused to plunder it for building stone but instead merely cleaned away the debris. In the process, skeletons were uncovered, which Everett assumes to be from the time of the siege and Battle of the Alamo in 1836. Everett's accounts of frontier life in the rather rambunctious confines of San Antonio, complete with ambushes, shootouts, rough and ready court trials, and various local characters are often riveting.

Everett also pictures the moods and attitudes of the soldiers toward a variety of issues. Everett describes their arduous marches, unsavory living conditions, often dire medical care, and the cruel climate tormenting them. Having been left behind in San Antonio with all the stores rejected by the army, which had proceeded on into Mexico, Everett's men were faced with nursing broken down mules and horses back to usefulness, salvaging wagon parts from several damaged ones to make a serviceable one, and generally, trying to make do with what could be had in the vicinity, or easily transported from the Quartermaster at New Orleans.

According to Everett, communications on the Texas frontier often proceeded through "solitary express riders." He describes Mexican culture co-existing with "the Indians" and their horse-stealing. He also gives an excellent but pejorative account of the Texas Rangers and their activities, calling them desperados. Everett describes Mexican Generals Santa Anna, Torrejón, and Woll, the exceedingly unpopular U. S. Army Colonel Churchill, officers George W. Hughes, 1st Lieutenant W. B. Franklin, 2nd Lieutenant F. T. Bryan, General Zachary Taylor ("Old Rough and Ready"), General Winfield Scott, and General James Morgan, Captain J. H. Prentiss, Brigadier General John E. Wool, Major General Worth, Captain James Harvey Ralston, Captain L. Sitgreaves, as well as Edward Everett's own two brothers Charles Everett and Samuel W. Everett (Sam).

Full of absorbing narrative and elusive details often lost in larger historical works, the content of Everett's narratives and letters may be summed up in his own words from the handwritten memoir: "Mine is not a tale of battles, or of the movements of great armies, but the details will show some of the hardships and vicissitudes of a soldier's life, the exposure to which causes a greater sacrifice of life than that ensuing from wounds of death received from the enemy."

Everett, Edward

George R.R. Martin Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000004
  • Collection

This collection consists of the personal papers, manuscripts, memorabilia, and other associational material of science fiction and fantasy author George R.R. Martin.

Martin, George R.R.

Glen Cook Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000216
  • Collection
  • 1973

This collection consists of the typed manuscript with handwritten edits of Cook's 1973 short story "The Night of Dreadful Silence". Also included is one blurb with the cover format.

Cook, Glen

Gordon Eklund Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000194
  • Collection
  • 1973

This collection consists of the manuscript for Eklund's 1973 story "The Stuff of Time", which was published in the September 1973 issue of Fantastic Stories.

Eklund, Gordon

Grace Paley Collection

  • US TxAM-C 196
  • Collection

This collection contains three published editions (First English, Second English & Second American) of The Little Disturbances of Man (1960-1969), Plaey's first book.  A published and a uncorrected proof copy of Enormous Changes (1975), two published editions of Leaning Forward (1985), two proof copies of Later the Same Day (1985), all books by Grace Paley, several autographed.

Also included are several political leaflets and fliers (1967-1982) autographed and annotated by Paley, as well as three limited edition posters (1982, 1985), typescripts and manuscripts of early drafts, a speech (1970) and an article (1972), several of which are autographed or annotated -- all by Paley, plus a copy of What did you learn in school today... a 1977 Peace Calendar - with a forward by Paley (Paley's personal copy).

Paley, Grace, 1922

Gregory Benford Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000205
  • Collection
  • 1981

This collection consists of photocopies of the 49 page typed manuscript for the novelette, Shall We Take a Little Walk, published in Destinies, the winter of 1981.

Benford, Gregory, 1941

Harriette Andreadis Women's Studies Research Collection and Personal Archive

  • US TxAM-C 1528
  • Collection

This collection includes Dr. Andreadis' research files, library, journals, writings, correspondence, and manuscript materials which were collected during her 40 years as a member of the faculty of Texas A&M. Dr. Harriette Andreadis retired in the Spring of 2014 donating her materials well as several personal items to Cushing Memorial Library & Archives.

Andreadis, Harriette

Harry Harrison Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000192
  • Collection
  • 1980

This collection consists of the manuscript for Harrison's one-act play The Day After the End of the World, written in 1980. The manuscript is 15 leaves typed with handwritten edits.

Harrison, Harry, 1925

Imamu Amiri Baraka Collection

  • US TxAM-C 298
  • Collection

This collection contains over 100 items, primarily books that are cataloged and available via the Libcat system. The manuscript and drawings are also cataloged and available via the Libcat system.

Baraka, Amiri, 1934-2014

Jack T. Kent Radio Script Collection

  • US TxAM-C 185
  • Collection

These papers consist of radio lectures on radio station 1620 WTAW-AM in College Station, Texas between 1945 and 1950. The lectures were given by Jack T. Kent, Albert Edward Finlay, W. E. Ross, Roger Valentine McGee, Walter Lee Porter, and James Wendell Ross focusing on mathematics, mathematicians and the solar system.

Kent, Jack T.

Janet Fox Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000191
  • Collection
  • 1973

This collection consists of the manuscript for Fox's short story A Witch in Time, published in September 1973. The manuscript is typed, 22 pages with an additional 2-page blurb.

Fox, Janet

John Q. Anderson Papers

  • US TxAM-C 19
  • Collection
  • 1953-1966

The John Q. Anderson papers consist of term papers, course handouts, folklore fieldnotes, news clippings, a report, a document, maps, photographs, materials about folksingers, pamphlets on wildlife, materials about vaudeville and North Carolina, information given to Dr. Anderson on Texas, correspondence of Dr. John Q. Anderson, and information on The Texas Folklore Society and The John A. Lomax Folklore Society.

The majority of the material is from Dr. John Q. Anderson's students at Texas A&M. Dr. Anderson assigned his students to write term papers on folklore from many locales, including Texas. Because Dr. Anderson felt that some of these student papers were so exceptional, he collected, edited and had them published in a book he titled, Texas Lore: A Collection of Student Papers on Texas Folklore. As additional information on some of the term papers, some of students gave Dr. Anderson information on North Carolina and Billy Arlington and Co. Dr. Anderson also requested that his students collect information on folklore by interviewing people and recording this information in fieldnotes. In this way information was gathered and is represented in the collection on topics including folk medicine, games, children's lore, folk beliefs, folk sayings, proverbs, rhymes, riddles, tree and plant lore, and Aggie lore.

Along with interviews and fieldnotes contributed by the students, many news clippings were collected, pertaining to people, places, folk medicine, folk singers, folk games, folklore book reviews, anthropology, superstitions, magic, and etymology. The majority of these clippings relate to Texas. Also present is one document on folk medicine, an article on folksinger Joan Baez, a few articles on a some Texas counties, and special editions of some Texas newspapers.

Other materials in the papers consist of correspondence between Dr. John Q. Anderson and the Texas Folklore Society, or the John A. Lomax Society. Most of the remaining correspondence deals with people interested in folklore. Some materials are present as well about meetings and conferences to be held by the Texas Folklore Society, including a program which Dr. Anderson sponsored at Texas A&M for the John A. Lomax Society.

Anderson, John Q.

John Varley Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000223
  • Collection
  • 1981

This collection consists of a photocopy of the 83-page typescript for Varley's 1981 story "Blue Champagne".

Varley, John

Jon Manchip White Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000174
  • Collection
  • 1965

This collection consists of the release dialogue script of the 1965 Paramount film Crack in the World starring Dana Andrews as Dr. Steven Sorenson, who plans to tap the geothermal energy of the Earth's interior by means of a thermonuclear device detonated deep within the Earth. Despite dire warnings by fellow scientist Ted Rampion (Kieron Moore), Sorenson proceeds with the experiment after secretly learning that he is terminally ill. This experiment causes a crack to form and grow within the earth's crust, which threatens to split the earth in two if it is not stopped in time. The screenplay was written by White and Julian Halevy.

White, Jon M.

Joseph F. Pumilia Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000183
  • Collection

This collection consists of the manuscript for Pumilia's radio play "The Case of the Martian Minister" (typed, 11 leave), produced for the Houston Science Fiction Society.

Pumilia, Joseph F.

Karl T. Pflock "AFC" Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000255
  • Collection
  • 1973

This collection consists of the manuscript with handwritten edits of the story "AFC", by Karl T. Pflock, published in Fantasticin September 1973, accompanied by a typewritten blurb.

Pflock, Karl, 1943-2006

Kristine Kathryn Rusch The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000516
  • Collection

This collection consists of manuscripts of short fiction, book reviews, and nonfiction pieces submitted to The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction during the editorship of Kristine Kathryn Rusch from 1991-1997. (Several stories in the collection would be actually published in F&SF by Rusch's successor Gordon Van Gelder, who edited the magazine between 1997-2015.) With a few exceptions, all of the manuscripts were eventually published in the magazine.

Many of the manuscripts in the collection contain handwritten edits, most of which are grammatical or structural and made by copyeditors. A minority of edits, some of them more substantive textual alterations, appear to have been made by the authors themselves.

Rusch, Kristine Kathryn

Margaret Van Bavel Papers on Boonville

  • US TxAM-C 1286
  • Collection
  • 1937-1987

These papers on Boonville, contain the Boone and Bryan family history in a compilation of biographies, clippings, and photocopies from books and newspapers, and other topics on the history of Boonville, TX.

The papers also contain land acre maps of the town of Boonville and several genealogies including the genealogy of the Harvey Mitchell family.

van Bavel, Margaretha H. M.

Michael Moorcock Manuscripts

  • US TxAM-C C000215
  • Collection

This collection consists of manuscripts and related materials from noted science fiction and fantasy author Michael Moorcock.

Moorcock, Michael

Mildred Watkins Mears Papers

  • US TxAM-C 192
  • Collection
  • 1946-1963

This collection consists of some correspondence, a significant number of mostly typed manuscript drafts, both published and unpublished, and a printer's galley for her book, Coryell County Scrapbook, published in 1963 by Texian Press of Waco, Texas. Also present are a few newspaper clippings, as well as handwritten and typed research notes for her published book.

The manuscript drafts reveal an engaging blend of scholarship, personal recollection, and anecdotal history chronicling the development of Coryell county from when the area was part of Coahuila, Mexico, through to its formal organization as a county in the state of Texas in 1854. Included is an account of the growth of Fort Hood as a military base in the early 1960s.

Stories are cited from early twentieth-century newspapers recounting Indian skirmishes with pioneering settlers, deeds of cattle rustlers and trail drivers, as well as events surrounding prohibition and various political rivalries. The early days of Fort Gates, now Gatesville, and the later development of Camp Hood, now Fort Hood, one of the nation's largest military installations, are described. Statistical tables and records present expenditures for, and descriptions of, buildings, jails, courthouses, prominent homes, banks, and businesses in Coryell county.

Interspersed among the political and economic accounts of the county's progress are more personal stories of weddings, births, parties, church events, legendary horses, dogs, local heroes, and even the county's centennial celebration in 1954. Mears' relatively unadorned narrative describes in some detail the increasing social, economic, and political prosperity and influence, as well as the setbacks, of Coryell County. Mears' work brings to life frontier Texas culture during the late nineteenth and early to mid-twentieth century.

Mears, Mildred Watkins

Murray Leinster "Honeymoon on Dlecka" Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000263
  • Collection
  • 1955

This collection consists of the typed manuscript (21 leaves) for Leinster's short story "Honeymoon on Dlecka", published in Fantastic Universe, July 1955.

Leinster, Murray, 1896-1975

Neal Barrett Jr. Slightly Off Center Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000268
  • Collection
  • 1992

This collection contains Slightly Off Center by Neal Barrett, Jr. with an introduction by Joe R. Lansdale. Advance Proof Copy, perfect bound. Austin, TX: Swan Press, 1992. 155 p.

Barrett, Neal, Jr., 1929-2014

Piers Anthony Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000270
  • Collection
  • Undated

The collection consists of carbon copies for the typed manuscripts Mer-Cycle (154 leaves) and Mer-Cycle, Part 2 (136 leaves).

Anthony, Piers

Poul Anderson Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000277
  • Collection
  • 1951-1983

This collection contains correspondence regarding Anderson’s writing and travel plans, 1951-1954, and manuscripts and galley proofs of "Ivory, and Apes, and Peacocks", The Devil’s Game, and Orion Shall Rise (1980-1983).

Anderson, Poul, 1926-2001

Robert Bloch Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000267
  • Collection

This collection contains the manuscript of a Diary found in the St. Louis Zoo. Typed, 16 leaves, carbon copies, signed by the author.

Bloch, Robert, 1917-1994

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