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William F. Nolan Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000142
  • Collection
  • 1991

This collection consists of the galley proofs of Helltracks.

Nolan, William F., 1991

Robert Charles Wilson Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000222
  • Collection

This collection consists of a photocopy of the manuscript for Wilson's 1988 novel Memory Wire.

Wilson, Robert

William Clark Manuscript

  • TxAM-CRS 214
  • Collection
  • 1857

This collection consists of Clark's original, handwritten manuscript of "A Trip Across the Plains in 1857" which was published in "The Iowa Journal of History and Politics" as an article, and a xerox copy of a handwritten transcription of the manuscript, due to its age.

Lewis Shiner Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000206
  • Collection
  • 1988

This collection consists of manuscripts for several of Stiner's short stories, as well as one for his 1990 short novel Slam.

Shiner, Lewis

David R. Bunch Manuscript

  • TxAM-CRS C000220
  • Collection
  • 1973

This collection consists of the typescript for Bunch's short story, "Moment of Truth in Suburb Junction", which was published in Fantastic, in September 1973. The 10-page typescript has handwritten edits and includes a note from Fantastic editor Ted White and a one-leaf blurb.

Bunch, David R.

Ursula K. LeGuin Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000244
  • Collection
  • 1988; 1989

This collection contains the original manuscript, with extensive author/editor edits, of Le Guin's 1989 nonfiction collection Dancing at the Edge of the World: Thoughts on Words, Women, Places.

LeGuin, Ursula

Guy Lillian Southern Fandom Press Alliance Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000009
  • Collection
  • 1961-2023

The Southern Fandom Press Alliance (SFPA) is a regional amateur press association (APA) generally based in the Southern United States, but with notable membership from other regions.  SFPA was formed in 1961, with Bill Jennings serving as the first Official Editor.  The first mailing was in September 1961, consisting of 76 pages of contributions.  The APA grew in both members and page count, with a record 100th mailing that contained over 1400 pages.  Guy Lillian served the APA as the Official Editor for a number of years. (C000009)

The collection also includes various mailings from the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society (LASFS) APA, which first began publication in 1976 and was still being published as of 2013.

Finally, there are some additional fanzines in the collection, published independently of SFPA or LASFS.

Lillian, Guy

Ardath Mayhar Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000262
  • Collection
  • 1970-2004

This collection includes manuscripts, papers, and publications from throughout Mayhar's career, but the bulk of the material dates from the late 1980s to the present.

Mayhar, Ardeth

Alyx Dellamonica and Kelly Robson Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000246
  • Collection
  • 1977-2021

This collection consists of materials from the lives and careers of Canadian science fiction and fantasy writers Alyx (A.M.) Dellamonica and Kelly Robson.

Materials include manuscripts, story notes and proofs for their published work as well as for unpublished 'trunk' stories and novels; correspondence, diaries, and various other items relating to their lives and their literary work.

Some of the materials are born digital and not, therefore, physically housed with the rest of the collection.

Dellamonica, A. M.

Piers Anthony Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000270
  • Collection
  • Undated

The collection consists of carbon copies for the typed manuscripts Mer-Cycle (154 leaves) and Mer-Cycle, Part 2 (136 leaves).

Anthony, Piers

Robert Bloch Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000267
  • Collection
  • undated

This collection contains the manuscript of a Diary found in the St. Louis Zoo. Typed, 16 leaves, carbon copies, signed by the author.

Bloch, Robert, 1917-1994

Robert Duncan Milne Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000261
  • Collection
  • 1879-1889

This collection consists of a group of thirty issues of The Argonaut (1879-1889) containing twenty-three science-fiction stories by Robert Duncan Milne, some in two or three parts. References to "Moskowitz" indicate his edition of eleven stories by Milne, Into the Sun (West Kingston, RI: Donald M. Grant, Publisher, 1980). Eighteen of the stories in this lot were not published in Moskowitz's edition and have never been reprinted, to the best of our knowledge.

The time period covered in this lot is 1879 to 1889. The Argonaut was generally printed on good, non-pulpy paper and, barring abuse, remains in good condition and can be handled with due care without fear of crumbling paper. The Argonaut was a weekly literary newspaper published in San Francisco starting in 1878 and running well into the 20th century. It contained political commentary as well as departmental reviews of books, drama, food, fashion, etc. Ambrose Bierce wrote weekly columns during the first two and a half years of its existence. The editors had a penchant for weird and fantastic fiction and published such material by W. C. Morrow, Emma Frances Dawson, Robert Duncan Milne and a host of other minor authors, as well as offering translations of European material in this vein. Milne was evidently popular among The Argonaut readers, for his stories are often featured on the front page.

Milne, Robert D.

Daniel Pinkwater Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000239
  • Collection
  • Undated

This collection consists of the typescript (9 pages) for the story "Women’s Chorus", by Pinkwater. The date of composition is unknown.

Pinkwater, Daniel

Michael Moorcock Manuscripts

  • US TxAM-C C000215
  • Collection

This collection consists of manuscripts and related materials from noted science fiction and fantasy author Michael Moorcock.

Moorcock, Michael

Alex Haley Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000012
  • Collection
  • 1949-1965, 1967, 1991

This collection consists of one box of material that includes heavily edited and complete manuscript pages from the Autobiography of Malcolm X, his writings on Mahalia Jackson, Wilma Rudolph, the story Queenie, a follow-up to Roots, and other writings. Also included are his notes regarding the re-run of the mini-series Roots. He mentions a meeting he had with Warren Beatty where they discussed Roots. The notes are titled "Re: Roots Re-Run for TV Guide. Between the Covers acquired the collection from a bookseller who bought it directly from the estate of Virginia Hannon. A group of early letters from Alex Haley it's seven letters sent between 1949-1954 (one from 1967) to close family friend, Virginia Hannon. The letters present Haley, then a journalist in the Coast Guard, trying to get his writing career started and relating thoughts about his working habits, carious siblings, and plans for the future. All letters are written light, optimistic, and sometimes flirtatious style. Accompanying them are several related photographs, including one of Hannon in uniform, and a copy of Haley's posthumous novel Queen inscribed to her by his brother, George.

The July 2015 addendum includes an archive of seven Typed Letters Signed from Alex Haley sent between 1949-1954 (with one from 1967) to a close family friend, along with related photographs and the first edition of Queen Inscribed by his brother George Haley. The letters are overall near fine with typical folds from being mailing and light toning, with their original mailing envelopes that show wear including are nick, tears, and chip, but all are present; the photos are fine. The book is fine in a fine dustwrapper.

The letters, which are signed both as "Alex" and "Palmer," his middle name, were written to Virginia Hannon, a woman who taught Alex Haley French at Alcorn College before he left to join the Coast Guard. The letters begin after he's become a journalist writing for Coast Guard Magazine, and it seems, after an absence from Hannon. The letters are very familiar and playful with references to her French class, updates on his brothers George and Julius, and although married, some flirtatious comments about her breasts, "they were not as you say, spinsterly," and his faraway demeanor in class, "believe me, love, I was not, when you observed me, thinking about any damned touchdowns." There is also lots of talk about Haley's writing career. The early letters from 1949 included his thoughts on his drive to be a writer: "I'm trying pretty hard and have thus far had some minor successes," as well as his bad habits: "I'm essentially lazy, but I love to write once I get started." It's during an extended hospital stay for the treatment of a pilonidal cyst in 1953 that he seems to really make headway: "I never had so much time on end to write in my life. I have to stand up to type, to be sure, but - boy, am I turning out the words! Things I've wanted to work on for ages." In a letter the next year he excitedly describes what was his first big career break: "The prime accomplishment to date, a milestone in my life, I guess, was the sale two weeks ago, of 'The Harlem that Nobody Knows,' a 4,000-word piece, to Reader's Digest ... As a result, I, last week, got taken in the stable of Ruth Aley, probably one of the top 5 literary agents in the country. I am working like a bastard, to put it bluntly." The job led to a series of articles in the magazine and an assignment with Playboy interviewing many of the most important African-Americans of the day. The final letter from 1967 takes the form of two short but sweet holograph notes to Hannon written on the margins of a form letter and a photocopied travel article. They show a busy, successful writer still trying to keep in touch with an old friend.

The letters are accompanied by a black and white photograph of a young Hannon in a military uniform (possibly Red Cross), along with two later color photos of George with Wynelle [Hannon's sister] and George with President Bill Clinton. Plus, there is a copy of Haley's book Queen, published posthumously, and warmly Inscribed by George: "To my dear sister, Virginia Rose Hannon With love, respect and appreciation Your brother George Haley - and all the rest of the Haley Family 12 June 1993." An interesting and intimate collection of early correspondence from one of the most influential African-American writers of the 20th Century.

Haley, Alex

Yates Stirling Jr. Diary of the Commander of the U.S.S. Von Steuben Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C 318
  • Collection
  • 1918-1928

This collection includes the manuscript diaries of the commander of the U.S.S. Von Steuben, 317 pages.12 mo (6X4 inches), original calf, worn; a few minor creases and tears, lacking the last 7 leaves (not part of diary proper).  Vp, January 1 to September 7, 1918; April 8 to June 21, 1919; and circa 1928. There are two bound diary volumes and one typescript entitled "Battle Between the U.S.S. Von Steuben and German Submarine", June 18, 1818.

Sterling, Yates Jr., 1872-1948

Margaret Lips van Bavel Papers on Boonville

  • US TxAM-C 1286
  • Collection
  • 1937-1987

This collection contains the Boone and Bryan family history in a compilation of biographies, clippings, and photocopies from books and newspapers, and other topics on the history of Boonville, TX. Also included are land acre maps of the town of Boonville and several genealogies including the genealogy of the Harvey Mitchell family.

van Bavel, Margaretha H. M.

Glen Cook Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000216
  • Collection
  • 1973

This collection consists of the typed manuscript with handwritten edits of Cook's 1973 short story "The Night of Dreadful Silence". Also included is one blurb with the cover format.

Cook, Glen

Gordon Eklund Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000194
  • Collection
  • 1973

This collection consists of the manuscript for Eklund's 1973 story "The Stuff of Time", which was published in the September 1973 issue of Fantastic Stories.

Eklund, Gordon

Edward Everett Papers

  • US TxAM-C C000024
  • Collection
  • 1846-1906

This collection dating from 1846 to 1906 (bulk: 1846-1847) consists chiefly of handwritten letters, journal entries, a memoir, a proof copy of a report from the U. S. Secretary of War on Army operations in Texas and on the Rio Grande during the Mexican War (1846-1848), as well as plans, maps and nine hand-colored copies of lithographic engravings drawn by Everett, which vividly chronicle southwest Texas cultural as well as military history during the late1840s.

Series 1, Letters (1847-1863), mainly handwritten in ink by Edward Everett to his brother, Samuel W. Everett, from 1846-1847, while Everett was serving in San Antonio de Bexar with the U. S. Army during the Mexican War. A few letters from other correspondents pertain to Everett's disability and eventual official discharge from the Army. Three letters written in the period 1852-1863 are about business or from family members.

Series 2, Journal and Memoir (1846-1899) contains three sets of journal entries for Sept. 1846-Jan. 1847. All are handwritten in ink on loose sheets of paper. The memoir, also handwritten in ink, on machine-ruled paper measuring about 8 x 5 inches, covers the years 1846-1848, with additional material added and dated, on at least one page, with 1899. This memoir is edited in pencil by Everett, evidently for publication, since one note suggests that the memoir was donated in 1899 to the Quincy Historical Society, later known as The Illinois Historical Society. The memoir was actually published, at least part, or possibly all of it, under the title "Military Experience," in Transactions of the Illinois Historical Society for 1905.

Series 3, Engravings, Maps, and Plans (ca. 1846-1849) includes nine copies of lithographed illustrations drawn by Edward Everett and engraved by C. B Graham Lithographers in Washington, D.C. The engravings were to be published in a report on U.S. Army operations in Texas during the Mexican War. A proof copy of this 67-page report, titled Report of the Secretary of War, communicating ... the Operations of the Army of the United States in Texas and the Adjacent Mexican states on the Rio Grande (31st Congress, 1st Session, Senate. Executive Document 32), published in 1850, is annotated throughout by Everett in pencil. For this publication Everett was at least responsible for eight illustrations: seven engravings of the San Antonio de Bexar area, including the Alamo church, as well as locations in Mexico; a plan of the ruined Alamo as it was in 1846, before being renovated according to Everett's direction, as a U. S. Army supply depot and workshops.

Engravings include nine copies of the lithographed prints. Notations made in ink on the separate prints, and on p. [4] of the proof copy of the published government report, indicate that: illustrations numbered for publication 2, 3-6 were engraved from original drawings made by Everett; those numbered 1, 7-8 were engraved from drawings made by Everett based on pencil sketches by other individuals, particularly no. 1 titled "Watch Tower Near Monclova," which was drawn by Everett from a sketch by Lieutenant McDowell of the U.S. Army.

Everett's proofs of the lithographic prints have all been exquisitely hand-tinted, in contrast to the severe black-and-white reproductions in the printed report. Of the nine hand-colored prints, two are duplicates of two illustrations, one titled "Church Near Monclova," and the other "Watch Tower Near Monclova." These identical prints are each hand-colored in two versions, apparently to represent the depicted buildings' appearances during the daytime, as well as at dusk or sunset.

Maps include one copy of a published map, possibly also by Everett, though it has been attributed to Josiah Gregg, which also appeared in the 1850 Army Operations report, titled "Map Showing the Route of the Arkansas Regiment from Shreveport La. to San Antonio de Bexar Texas," which is annotated with a penciled in route drawn from San Antonio to Austin, and a town location labeled "New Braunsfels." Also included are two manuscript versions of a map by Edward Everett, one copy titled "Plan of the Vicinity of Austin and San Antonio, Texas."

Plans are represented by two copies of an illustration drawn by Everett for the 1849 Army operations report showing plans of the Alamo before the renovation, titled "Plans of the Ruins of the Alamo near San Antonio De Bexar, 1846." Also present is one manuscript plan, titled "Plan of San Antonio de Bexar, Texas, 1848," which is labeled as "Drawn from recollection by E. E." The legend states that locations number 1-5 on the plan show, for instance, the spot near the Plaza in town where Everett received his disabling gunshot wound in the leg, the Hospital where he convalesced, and the Quartermaster's Office, to which he was assigned to work after being declared disabled from active service in the field.

A handwritten loose-leaf page kept with the proof copy of the report is titled "Index to Col. Hughes Report," and lists subject divisions and page numbers, though these divisions are not present in the published report by Hughes.

Thus Everett's accounts of frontline actions in the Mexican War mainly rely on reports from occasional volunteer soldiers or scouts, or Mexican nationals, returning back to Texas from the front lines of battle in Mexico. As much as he is able, however, Everett produces very detailed accounts of the various battles and skirmishes in and around the Texas-Mexico border, including battles at Monterrey, Saltillo, San Luis, Camargo, Buena Vista, Vera Cruz, and Tampico, recording a large number of casualties on both sides.

Of particular interest is Everett's extensive first-hand description of the ruins of the Alamo, and how it was converted for U.S. Army use as a military headquarters, according to plans drawn up by Everett. He deplores the vandalism already wreaked by relic seekers and stressed the respect shown to the mission church by the U. S. Army restorers, who refused to plunder it for building stone but instead merely cleaned away the debris. In the process, skeletons were uncovered, which Everett assumes to be from the time of the siege and Battle of the Alamo in 1836. Everett's accounts of frontier life in the rather rambunctious confines of San Antonio, complete with ambushes, shootouts, rough and ready court trials, and various local characters are often riveting.

Everett also pictures the moods and attitudes of the soldiers toward a variety of issues. Everett describes their arduous marches, unsavory living conditions, often dire medical care, and the cruel climate tormenting them. Having been left behind in San Antonio with all the stores rejected by the army, which had proceeded on into Mexico, Everett's men were faced with nursing broken down mules and horses back to usefulness, salvaging wagon parts from several damaged ones to make a serviceable one, and generally, trying to make do with what could be had in the vicinity, or easily transported from the Quartermaster at New Orleans.

According to Everett, communications on the Texas frontier often proceeded through "solitary express riders." He describes Mexican culture co-existing with "the Indians" and their horse-stealing. He also gives an excellent but pejorative account of the Texas Rangers and their activities, calling them desperados. Everett describes Mexican Generals Santa Anna, Torrejón, and Woll, the exceedingly unpopular U. S. Army Colonel Churchill, officers George W. Hughes, 1st Lieutenant W. B. Franklin, 2nd Lieutenant F. T. Bryan, General Zachary Taylor ("Old Rough and Ready"), General Winfield Scott, and General James Morgan, Captain J. H. Prentiss, Brigadier General John E. Wool, Major General Worth, Captain James Harvey Ralston, Captain L. Sitgreaves, as well as Edward Everett's own two brothers Charles Everett and Samuel W. Everett (Sam).

Full of absorbing narrative and elusive details often lost in larger historical works, the content of Everett's narratives and letters may be summed up in his own words from the handwritten memoir: "Mine is not a tale of battles, or of the movements of great armies, but the details will show some of the hardships and vicissitudes of a soldier's life, the exposure to which causes a greater sacrifice of life than that ensuing from wounds of death received from the enemy."

Everett, Edward

Alan Dean Foster Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000193
  • Collection
  • 1977

This collection contains a 286-page unproofed typed copy of Foster's 1977 novel The End of the Matter.

Foster, Alan D.

Association of Former Students (AFS) Proclamations

  • US TxAM-C 116
  • Collection

This collection contains proclamations issued by The Association of Former Students in recognition of the outstanding contributions of Texas A&M former students.

The Association of Former Students

Howard Waldrop Golden Gryphon Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000585
  • Collection
  • 2002-2003

This collection contains materials relating to Golden Gryphon Press and its publication of Howard Waldrop's 2003 novelette "A Better World's In Birth!". Materials in the collection include Waldrop's hand-typed manuscript, editor Marty Halpern's edited draft of the story, a final typescript, a copy of the chapbook and a cover flat, and electronic copies of the final typescript.

The novelette tells the story of an alternate central Europe, in which a Communist revolution occurred in the middle of the 19th century, led by Karl Marx, Friederich Engels, and Richard Wagner. In 1876, rumors fly that the ghosts of these three revolutionary martyrs have begun appearing in the city of Dresden. The story examines how these specters may be tied into a larger political conspiracy.

Waldrop, Howard

Texas A&M Race and Ethnic Studies Institute (RESI) Archives

  • TxAM-CRS 232
  • Collection
  • 1991-1998; 2003-2005

The archives consist of photographs, publications, correspondence, and reports on the early history of RESI under the directions of its first two directors, Dr. Gail E. Thomas (1991-98) and Dr. Mitchell F. Rice (1999-2004). The institute was founded in 1991 and established to highlight Texas A&M University's strengths and academic leadership in research relating to the study of race and ethnicity and their various dimensions (e.g., intersections with class, gender, and sexuality; past, present, and future relevance to issues of education, immigration, politics, culture, and health).

Race and Ethnic Studies Institute

William A. Owens Papers, Part One

  • TxAM-CRS 23
  • Collection
  • 1922-1979

This collection contains papers documenting Owens' teaching and writing career from 1928 to 1979. Items of special interest in the collection include lyrics to many folksongs and recordings made by Owens in the 1930s and 1940s of folksingers as well as recorded readings of Robert Frost, interviews of early oil pioneers of Texas, legal papers for Owens vs. Fawcett Publications, Inc. and David Holland concerning True magazine's plagiarism of Slave Mutiny, and letters of Roy Bedichek, J. Frank Dobie, Walter Prescott Webb, and Mody C. Boatright.

The correspondence is further separated into three areas: personal correspondence; correspondence with Owens' literary agent, Maurice Crain; and correspondence regarding Owens' books. Some overlapping exists between these areas. In the personal correspondence section, letters discussing Owens' books are largely from friends and fans and are nontechnical in nature. The correspondence with Maurice Crain concerns the publication procedures and business aspect of his writings while the boxes of letters specifically concerning the books deal primarily with the writing and development of the books.

The personal correspondence is arranged chronologically from 1932 to 1975. The letters are concerned with associations and societies to which Owens belonged; speaking engagements by Owens; programs in which he was involved; awards presented to Owens; and Owens' teaching career which includes letters to Owens as Director of Folk Festivals at the University of Texas, as an instructor at Texas A&M University, and as Professor and Dean of Summer Sessions at Columbia University. Other letters concern Owens' service as an Intelligence Officer in World War II and his early work with folksongs. In addition to correspondence from Owens' family and friends, there are letters congratulating Owens on his publications and requesting his literary advice. Of special interest are letters from famous persons such as Grant Wood, Eleanor Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and Nelson Rockefeller.

Correspondence with Maurice Crain contains letters from 1950 to 1959. The letters discuss publication and promotional plans for Owens' books and short stories. Other subject areas include foreign and domestic contracts for publication, royalty statements, and motion picture plans for several books.

The correspondence concerning books is arranged in chronological order based on the year of the book's publication. Included are letters regarding contracts with publishers, royalty statements, motion picture rights, and lectures on the books. Numerous letters discuss Owens' research and recordings of folksongs for Texas Folk Songs. Additional correspondence with Mrs. Walter B. Sharp, Dudley Sharp, and other oil pioneers refers to the Oral History of Texas Oil Pioneers.

Material concerning Owens' books includes background material, book reviews, typescripts, drafts, and in most cases galley proofs and page proofs. The boxes are arranged chronologically according to the publication date from the earliest to the last. However, the revised edition of Texas Folk Songs which was published in 1976 is included with the papers of the 1950 edition. Labels that Owens used on the papers, such as the numbers of a draft, have been retained, and where there was no designation of a draft number, the typescript is merely labeled typescript, early draft, or manuscript. The papers include both photocopies and ribbon copies and duplicates of typescripts. Typescript and manuscript are used interchangeably as labels.

The evolution of each of Owens' books can be seen through the background material and copies of drafts. In the first folders are Owens' research material and notes, book reviews, advertisements, and other information pertaining to the book in subject matter. Copies of typescripts, from the earliest to the final edited manuscript are next with the last folders containing galley proofs and page proofs. Through the revisions and changes made by Owens in each subsequent draft, the progressive development of notes and a rough outline into a complete and polished publication is revealed. Papers of major interest include a copy of Owens' doctoral dissertation on folksongs for the State University of Iowa (June 1941) with Texas Folk Songs material, the legal papers from the Owens vs. Fawcett Publications, Inc. and David Holland concerning Slave Mutiny, interviews of oil pioneers of Texas with material for Oral History of Texas Oil Pioneers and Walter B. Sharp biography, and the correspondence of Dobie, Bedichek, and Webb revealing their ideas about many varied subjects included with Three Friends material.

Other writings by Owens comprise the next section of the collection. Articles and short stories are filed alphabetically. Book reviews are grouped together in one folder. Speeches are filed last and are labeled with the title or meeting at which they were given and the date if known. Typescripts exist of most of the articles and short stories, and duplicate copies are retained. Some of these writings occur in their published version and are labeled with the title and date of the magazine in which they were printed. The dates of the other stories and articles are unknown. The subjects of Owens' stories and articles cover a wide range of subjects and span the entirety of his writing career. Published excerpts from his books such as This Stubborn Soil and Tales From the Derrick Floor are included in this group as well.

The personal data concerning Owens contains biographical information such as vitae, resumes, publications concerning programs and lectures in which he participated, and material relating to his teaching career. Additional material documents his years at Columbia University and awards presented to him. Newspaper articles and photographs from 1940 to 1974 concern Owens' many interests and involvement in programs as well as his books and teaching career.

The next boxes in the collection contain miscellaneous material kept by Owens. Many oil history photographs and newspapers articles relating to subjects in which Owens was interested are included. Articles by other authors, some signed by the author and some written by friends of Owens, along with magazines and publications collected by Owens are filed in this section. The miscellaneous publications are divided into three categories: literary publications, college publications, and remaining miscellaneous publications. These deal with a wide variety of subjects in which Owens was apparently interested.

The remaining three boxes contain aluminum discs of recordings made by Owens of various folksingers and country people of the South. Note cards listing titles numbered to correspond with the records are filed with the discs. Owens also made recordings of readings by Robert Frost in 1939, and these provide a valuable addition to the collection.

Copies of Owens' books are shelved with the boxed papers. Oversize items including an advertisement for Three Friends: Bedichek, Dobie, Webb, color prints of the Apollo 11 Lunar Mission, and maps and genealogies for A Fair and Happy Land are housed separately in oversize flat storage.

Owens, William A., 1905-1990

Robert L. Dawson French Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 411
  • Collection
  • circa 1570-circa 1970

This collection consists of manuscripts, typescripts, printed items, correspondence, official documents, and publications from the French seventeenth to twentieth centuries. Authors and addressees include many personalities prominent in French history but also many ordinary individuals.

Dawson, Robert L.

Rudyard Kipling Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 161
  • Collection
  • 1882-1982

This collection, compiled by Professor A. W. Yeats, contains numerous letters handwritten by Kipling, copies of Kipling letters, letters written by his sister Alice Fleming discussing her childhood with Kipling, and correspondence from Kipling's wife Caroline and daughter Elsie.

Included in the collection are many original newspaper clippings, poems, short stories, photos, drawings, . articles, a publishing contract, lists of various Kipling collections, material regarding the Kipling Society and the Last Will and Testaments of Rudyard Kipling, his wife Caroline and his sister Alice Fleming.

The collection, through a large display of original and reproduced letters, gives a peek at the kind of everyday tasks that Rudyard, as a famous author, and his wife Caroline had to contend with. Through its many newspaper clippings and articles written about him, the collection shows how eminent Rudyard Kipling was as a writer both in the 19th and the 20th centuries. It also serves as an introduction to the Kipling Society, its founding and difficulties therein, as well as the struggles legal and otherwise that surrounded Kipling's work during his life, continuing many years after his death. The collection contains interesting facts about the Kipling family, including some light genealogy, the places they lived and visited, and the people they knew.

There are some thirty-six Rudyard Kipling autograph pieces, all of which are letters excluding a few poems and miscellaneous items. The collection contains many original letters of Alice Fleming, Caroline Kipling, Elsie (Kipling) Bambridge, J.H.C. Brooking, A. W. Yeats and various others as well as many copies of letters from other Kipling collections throughout the country. In addition to any personal correspondence, there are many letters and notes, several minutes, member lists and other paraphernalia of the Kipling Society founded by J.H.C. Brooking in 1926 [?]. There is an assortment of page-proofs, galleys, original drafts, and copies of Kipling's poems, short stories, and manuscripts, along with a wide range of newspaper clippings dealing with all aspects of Kipling's life and influences on society. In addition, the collection has several original and copied catalogs from bookseller's and auction houses holding Kipling material.

Along with the letters, clippings, and many books in the Rudyard Kipling Collection at Texas A&M University, the collection contains items such as an autograph copy of "The Foreloper" framed with an illustration by an unidentified artist, the manuscript for "The Maltese Cat," and the ledger book of Mr. T.E. Elwell, an early member of the Kipling Society, who made many notes and collected numerous clippings towards a Kipling bibliography.

Kipling, Rudyard

Lisa Tuttle Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000181
  • Collection
  • 1959-2013

The Lisa Tuttle Collection consists of books, manuscripts, galley proofs, and magazines tracing the storied career of science fiction, horror and fantasy writer Tuttle.  The collection is a work-in-progress, with additions from the author as they become available.

Tuttle, Lisa

Victoria McManus Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000459
  • Collection
  • 1979 - 2022

This collection contains manuscripts and other materials relating to the literary career of science fiction, fantasy, paranormal romance, and erotica writer Victoria McManus, who writes under the names "Victoria Janssen" and "Elspeth Potter". Materials in this collection include manuscripts and drafts of McManus' published and unpublished work, correspondence, contracts and financial documentation, and convention materials.

Also included are large numbers of fanzines, particularly for the British show *Blake's 7", for which McManus wrote a number of stories.
Some of the fanzines is identified as "slash” (s) or "het" (h). "Slash" refers to fanworks that feature same-sex relationships and are sometimes (though not always) sexually explicit. In slash, sexual identity, sexuality and/or romance are often the centers of the story, rather than the conventional adventures featured in more traditional fanworks. "Het" refers to fanworks featuring sexual or romantic content, but with opposite-sex relationships. "Gen" (more standard stories containing no sexual content) and het items are identified as such on the item folder. If an item is not identified as slash or het, it is to be assumed that the item is slash..

McManus, Victoria

Martha Wells Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000133
  • Collection
  • 1991-2021

This collection consists of manuscript drafts, copyedited manuscripts, and galley proofs of all of Martha Wells' novels, as well as a number of other materials that include program books from many science fiction and fantasy conventions.

The March 2017 Addendum contains mostly media-related materials, particularly from the television show _Hercules: The Legendary Journeys_and the _Star Wars_films.

Wells, Martha

Steve Rasnic Tem and Melanie Tem Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000381
  • Collection
  • 1962 - 2022

This collection contains materials relating to the lives and literary careers of horror writers Steve Rasnic Tem and Melanie Tem. Materials in the collection include manuscripts of novels, short stories, and other works by the Tems, whether written as individuals or together as co-writers; associated literary materials; correspondence; and other materials. Also included are recorded podcast interviews of Steve Rasnic Tem and readings of works by the Tems.

Also included are several literary awards won by the Tems individually and jointly.

Tem, Steve Rasnic, 1950-

George R.R. Martin Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000004
  • Collection

This collection consists of the personal papers, manuscripts, memorabilia, and other associational material of science fiction and fantasy author George R.R. Martin.

Martin has also deposited as part of his collection a growing assortment of books, including his own work in various editions and translations, as well as works that he has edited or to which he has contributed. A bibliography of these books is available from the Reading Room upon request and items from that list are available for consultation.

Martin, George R.R.

Joe R. Lansdale Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000207
  • Collection

This collection contains manuscripts, correspondence, books, magazines, and other material related to Lansdale's writing career, circa 1989-2003.

Lansdale, Joe R., 1951

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