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World War II Map of Italy

  • US TxAM-C 115
  • Colección
  • 1943

This collection contains two topographical maps marked with military grid lines, originally published in 1941 by the British War Office, but apparently used by American forces in this instance. One for Cassino, Italy (sheet 160), the other for Isernia, Italy (Sheet 161), in Transverse Mercator Projection with military grid lines and joined with linen tape along the south grid number 96 to form one sheet measuring 50 cm x 72 cm. The map legend is missing on both sections however cities, towns, rivers, streams, roads (major roads in red stamped with numbers), railroads, relief is shown by contour lines, and spot heights can be seen.

The Isernia map is inscribed on the lower half of the back of it mostly in pencil, but with a few notes in ink. The inscriptions, possibly in several different hands, record times of day by the military clock, and locations numerically oriented on the military grid map for various military actions. These actions include remarks on place and type of artillery or small arms fire, observations on the taking of prisoners of war, and other actions in the area southwest of the Rapido River and the town of Cassino. According to the orientation of the action, these notes apparently record fighting by Allied forces against the German army in the Mignano Gap region preceding the Battle of Monte Cassino (January 12, 1944 - May 19, 1944).

The linen tape joining the two maps appears to have been added after inscriptions made on the Isernia map, but most likely during the campaign itself, to be useful for the entire area involved in the Battle of Monte Cassino. Polish troops, the 7th Infantry, and the name Custer are mentioned. The Isernia map is also inscribed in ink in the margin at the top with "Knapp - 31309661, K Co." (possible serial number and company designation K for a soldier named Knapp).

Published by the War Office of Great Britain, originally in 1941, though both sections have a date of 1943 for the second edition. Both maps are designated part of the series "Geographical Section, General Staff, No. 4164." Maps may have been reproduced by the U.S. Army Map Service.

British War Office

John A. Adams NAFTA Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 87
  • Colección
  • 1982-1999

This collection contains materials collected and assembled by John A. Adams, Jr. as an active United States participant in the negotiations and agreement to permit free trade among the United States, Canada, and Mexico in what became the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1987. As a trained historian, Adams recognized the importance of documenting as much of the process as a single active participant could. In that process, he accumulated a wide variety of materials that include clippings, magazine articles, books, reports, correspondence, notes, newswire reports, pamphlets, leaflets, conference papers and programs, and other types of documents that shed light on the process of negotiating an international treaty.

After the treaty was formally approved by all parties involved, Adams boxed all of the documents he had collected, produced a report in which he briefly described the contents of each of the twenty-one boxes, and then gave them to the Political Sciences and Economics Library (PSEL) of the Texas A&M University Libraries where they were then house in three filing cabinets. A copy of Adams' report has been cataloged with a call number of HF 17456. A33.

During the 2005-2006 academic year, the materials were removed from the filing cabinets in PSEL and placed into 19 cubic foot archival boxes by Archivist Charles R. Schultz, who at the time also created a report of his own which included an inventory description of the contents used in the creation of this collection record. After the materials were rehoused and inventoried, they were deposited into the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives where all of the archives and special collections materials are housed.

The materials have been kept in the original folders in which Mr. Adams had them when he presented them to Texas A&M University. Some of the materials were not in folders when they were rehoused from the filing cabinets into boxes at PSEL and are still not in folders. In those cases where materials were not in boxes, that information is included in the descriptions of the folders in each of the nineteen boxes.

Adams, John A., Jr., 1951-

Paul C. Aebersold Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 219
  • Colección
  • 1924-1970

This collection contains biographical materials, correspondence, programs of conferences attended and/or participated in, notes, photographs, memos, reports, proposals, itineraries, lists of contacts, minutes of committee meetings, news releases, newspaper clippings, articles and other writings by Dr. Aebersold, and notes, outlines, slide lists, abstracts, and texts of speeches given by Dr. Aebersold. The materials document Dr. Aebersold's career well from graduate student days to Atomic Energy Commission officials. A considerable amount of additional information should be available in the files of the Manhattan Project and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

Among the most important items in the papers are the 294 speeches and 100 articles and other writings by Dr. Aebersold, the 37 speeches and 180 articles he collected, and the 1,200 newspaper clippings. The speeches and articles reflect the latest thinking and reveal the broadest picture of developments even though they represent only a minute historical significance of the early activities of the Isotopes Branch and the use of isotopes in the immediate post-war period, Dr. Aebersold began to collect clippings about isotopes in earnest in 1946. Unfortunately, this extensive collection lasted only until 1949. During these three years, however, there certainly are very few aspects of isotope production, distribution, and use that are not mentioned in the clippings.

Although most of the correspondence deals with commitments to speak before various groups or with attendance at numerous conferences, some of the early letters prior to 1940 do record some of the thoughts and activities of Dr. Aebersold’s early associates at the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. Many congratulatory letters in 1957, when Dr. Aebersold moved from Oak Ridge to Washing, serve as a measure of his stature in the atomic energy field throughout the United States as well as South America and parts of Europe.

From time-to-time aspects of Dr. Aebersold’s character and philosophy are revealed in rather unexpected areas. That he enjoyed a good story is shown in numerous handwritten notes and a few typed introductory remarks to speeches. Unfortunately, only in a few cases did he write out the whole story. Usually, he only jotted a brief note to remind himself of a particular story. In speaking before the Knife and Fork Clubs of McAllen and Dallas, Texas on March 23 and November 16, 1948, Dr. Aebersold recalled his experiences in and reactions to the first atomic bomb test in New Mexico. These are about the only personal references to his wartime activities.

Aebersold, Paul C. (Paul Clarence), 1910-1967