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Eugene Butler Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 101
  • Collection
  • 1924-1987; Undated

This collection includes speeches, editorials, and articles written by Eugene Butler, dating from 1927 through 1987. These documents deal with a broad spectrum of issues of the day from Prohibition to bussing but focus primarily on agricultural topics.

Also contained in the collection are many Progressive Farmer articles and editorials, as well as correspondence. There are three complete issues of the magazine in the collection; one oversize and two in folders.

Other items in the collection include extensive material on the Progressive Farmer Company, cotton, and the Progressive Farmer Master Farm Family Award and individual winners.

Butler, Eugene

Joe R. Lansdale Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000207
  • Collection

This collection contains manuscripts, correspondence, books, magazines, and other material related to Lansdale's writing career, circa 1989-2003.

Lansdale, Joe R., 1951

Ardath Mayhar Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000262
  • Collection
  • 1970-2004

This collection includes manuscripts, papers, and publications from throughout Mayhar's career, but the bulk of the material dates from the late 1980s to the present.

Mayhar, Ardeth

Bill Crider Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000212
  • Collection
  • 1987

The collection spans Bill Crider's entire career. A near-complete run of manuscripts traces his writing career, supplemented by a correspondence file, miscellaneous material, and books and magazines. A long run of "DAPA-EM," the organ of a mystery writer's amateur press association completes the collection.

Crider, Bill

General Walter Krueger Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 160
  • Collection
  • 1943-1945

This collection includes copies of administrative orders, field orders, and weekly reports compiled by the staff of the Sixth Army and sent to General Krueger, as well as copies of operation reports sent from General Krueger to the Adjutant General in Washington, D. C. Also included are after-action operation reports concerning the 6th Army.

The administrative orders primarily contain data or amendments to accompany Field Orders and are concerned with supply, evacuation, traffic, service troops, personnel, prisoners of war, and miscellaneous items. Also included are instructions and annexes dealing with captured enemy equipment, individual clothing and equipment, supply, burials and cemeteries, native labor, sanitation, prisoners of war and enemy dead, captured material trophies, air supply circulars, and plans of operation. Maps and sketches are also found among the administrative orders.

The field orders contain data and instructions relating to hostile dispositions and support of operations, task forces, command posts, supplies, and communications. Also included are annexes concerned with staging, loading and embarkation plans, intelligence, artillery and antiaircraft artillery, communications, and engineering. Maps, sketches, and code names are also included in the field orders.

The weekly reports contain intelligence information on enemy activities, terrain, counterintelligence, material and equipment, captured documents and POW interrogations, reclassification of documents, enemy tactics, psychological warfare, and code names and numbers. Also included are photographic coverage reports, sketches, and maps.

The operation reports provide the history of the operation, including organization and operating instructions, plans and preparations, background and terrain, reconnaissance, communication, operations, enemy reaction, engineer activities, captured materials, relations with natives, the recapitulation of casualties, commendations, awards, and decorations, conclusions, credit for success, and lessons learned.

Krueger, Walter, 1881-1967

William A. Owens Papers, Part Three

  • TxAM-CRS 26
  • Collection
  • 1964-1988

This collection contains the third part of William A. Owens' materials deposited in the Cushing Archives. Materials consist of personal correspondence, from 1964 through 1988, essays, manuscripts, photographs, research for books, and articles.

Included within the series are short stories and articles such as "This Stubborn Soil", "Wildcatter", "Look to the River", "Tell Me a Story", "Sing Me a Song", "Historic Texas", "Eye Deep in Hell", and work by other authors; Cleaver and Witherspoon family genealogy; letters of Roy Bedichek; "Three Friends"; videotapes of Owens's work; and photographs.

Owens, William A., 1905-1990

William Schelly Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000182
  • Collection
  • 2003

This collection contains notes, checklists, copies of Otto Binder letters, and edited drafts of Bill Schelly’s Words of Wonder: The Life and Times of Otto Binder (2003).

Schelly, William

Sharon Faye Wilbur Star Trek Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000129
  • Collection
  • 1970-2013

The collection contains a wide variety of material related to Star Trek, including books, records, calendars and realia such as pins, playing cards, music boxes, pictures, magazines covering Star Trek, apparel, cups, and glasses, models, ornaments, and other collectibles.

Approximately 102 books have been integrated into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Research Collection. Each book added has a note "Sharon Faye Wilbur Star Trek Collection."

An additional series contains reference material relating to the author Andre Norton, with whom Wilbur was acquainted. Works by Norton that Wilbur owned have been integrated into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Research Collection.

Wilbur, Sharon Faye

Santa Rosa Ranch Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 27
  • Collection
  • 1890-1910

This collection consists mainly of correspondence, legal documents, a corporate minute book, and handwritten notes recording the litigation connected with ownership of a large tract of land (89,000 acres) in Hidalgo country known as the "Big Santa Rosa Pasture". Actual litigation took place from 1903-1910.

Individuals involved in the case were: Dillard Rucker Fant and his wife, Lucy Fant; Daniel J. Sullivan; J. C. Sullivan; James V. Upson; Wiliam R. Elliott; Conrad A. Goeth; James Webb; J. M. Chittim; Archie Parr; Kate V. Elliott; G. G. Clifford; A. E. Chavez; J. A. Galligher; W. M. Sanford; Fred Kelly; F. A. McGown; F. W. Church; H. R. Wood; F. Groos and his wife, Hulda Groos. Legal counsel involved in the proceedings were: James E. Webb and Conrad A. Goeth of Webb and Goeth, F. A. McGown of Denman, Franklin & McGown, and R. L. Ball, all based in San Antonio, Texas.

At the onset of the difficulties, D. R. Fant had leased the Big Santa Rosa Pasture to the cattle-raising partnership of Chittim and Parr. J. M. Chittim was a large rancher in South Texas and Archie Parr, was a State Senator popularly known as the Duke of Duval. Based on the large annual rent monies Fant had expected to collect from Chittim and Parr, he then also borrowed money from D. Sullivan of D. Sullivan and Company Bankers (founders and owners of the large South Texas Mariposa Ranch) and, using the same collateral, borrowed more money from the competing F. Groos and Company Bankers (later a founder of Wells Fargo Bank).

When it appears, that Chittim and Parr defaulted on their rent payment for the Big Santa Rosa Pasture to Fant, Fant was then forced to default on his own payments to both banking organizations from whom he had borrowed funds. The bankers, in return, sued and foreclosed on the Big Santa Rosa Pasture.

Through the Santa Rosa Ranch Papers extensive set of legal documents, attorneys' memoranda, telegrams, letters, and financial disclosures, the most absorbing story of Texas land politics unfolds.

Notable among the papers is the Santa Rosa Ranch Minute Book, a ledger volume with handwritten entries detailing the Articles of Incorporation, By-laws and minutes of the first stockholders' meeting of the Santa Rosa Ranch Company. Also present is a manuscript plat map in black and red ink on light blue linen, of the 1905 Maria Rodriguez survey, which has been encapsulated and is housed separately in a Map Case Drawer.

Santa Rosa Ranch

Robert W. Smith Martial Arts Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000026
  • Collection
  • 1930-2012

This collection includes the major focus of RWS's research in the 1950s and early 1960s, while Mr. Smith's publication projects span the early 1970s to 2000. His writings as John F. Gibley are thought to be a composite of his friends Jon Bluming and Donn F. Draeger. There are several boxes of papers, notes, manuscripts, books, photographs, historic 16 mm movie film, videotapes, and personal correspondence (covering six decades). Some of the prominent correspondence, writings, and photographs include noted science fiction author Ray Bradbury, martial artist Jon Bluming, Donn F. Draeger, writer Kay Boyle, British novelist and literary critic Sir Victor Sawdon Pritchett (VS Pritchett), writer and critic John Sanford (aka Julian Shapiro) and many more. He also offered a critical eye on American culture that is reflected in his reviews, articles, and papers he wrote and collected. Researchers will find substantial scientific articles on how the brain, mind and body work.

Smith, Robert W., 1926-

Robert E. Howard Collection

  • C000224
  • Collection
  • 1920-1997

A collection of letters to and from Robert E. Howard, from circa 1920-1936, with miscellaneous Howard items, copies of magazines featuring Howard stories, and books containing Howard stories and novels. Also included are a number of items relating to films based on Howard's works.

Howard, Robert E.

Robert Silverberg Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000231
  • Collection

This collection consists of numerous manuscripts and related materials - including outlines, notes, and proofs - of works by noted science fiction author Robert Silverberg.

Silverberg, Robert

Richard E. Geis Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000243
  • Collection
  • 1951-1953

This collection contains over 100 letters and postcards, most written by science fiction fan writers and editors regarding amateur writing and publishing, largely related to Psychotic (later Science Fiction Review), a fanzine published by Richard E. Geis from July 1953 to October/November 1955.

The correspondence includes letters from influential science fiction fans and fanzine editors of the period: Terry Carr (6 letters, 1 postcard), Harlan Ellison (2 letters, 1 postcard), Marion Zimmer Bradley (1 letter), Robert Silverberg (2 letters, 1 postcard), Ron Smith (editor of Inside, one of the more important fanzines of the 1950s) and others, as well as a letter from pro editor Samuel Mines (accompanied by drafts and carbon copies of fan letters from Geis to Mines critiquing material published in Startling Stories), and a typed letter on FBI letterhead from J. Edgar Hoover.

Martha Wells Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000133
  • Collection
  • 1991-2021

This collection consists of manuscript drafts, copyedited manuscripts, and galley proofs of all of Martha Wells' novels, as well as a number of other materials that include program books from many science fiction and fantasy conventions.

The March 2017 Addendum contains mostly media-related materials, particularly from the television show _Hercules: The Legendary Journeys_and the _Star Wars_films.

Wells, Martha

Richard Smith Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 310
  • Collection

This collection is UNPROCESSED.

Smith, Richard

JeFF Stumpo - Javashock Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 188
  • Collection
  • 1998-2008; Undated

The collection covers the personal, academic, and professional life of Jeff Stumpo and his founding of the Java Shock slam poetry event held initially in College Station, but now based in Bryan, TX.

Stumpo, Jeff

Ide Peebles Trotter Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 216
  • Collection
  • 1922-1964

This collection consist of correspondence, telegrams, notes, reports, speeches, newspaper clippings, and publications which span most of Trotter's career in Agricultural Education.

Some periods are much better documented than are others. Materials for the period before 1936 include some leaflets, a few letters, circulars and clippings, and one pamphlet. Trotter's move from Missouri to Texas is well documented in letters, bills, and telegrams, but his transfer to Agricultural Extension and then to the Graduate School at Texas A&M College in College Station, Texas are poorly covered. Most of the available information is in the newspaper clippings. Both moves were made during periods of controversy. Hopefully additional documentation can be found elsewhere in the records of Texas A&M University.

Trotter's activities as Director of Extension and Dean of the Graduate School at Texas A&M College should be fairly well covered in the records of those two offices. Unfortunately his personal papers conatain very little information on them. The only documentation on Trotter's two periods of foreign service is in the reports he wrote on his cotton surveys in 1948. Some special activities such as service on the Postwar Planning Committee and participation in Rural Church Conference are fairly well documented.

Trotter, Ide Peebles

Tom Anderson Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 17
  • Collection
  • 1953-1972

These papers consist of newspaper clippings containing information on income tax reform bills, vocational agriculture, and the Grass Roots Tax Revolt, reprints of the "Straight Talk" editorials from Farm and Ranch magazine, the author's copy of the 1958 third edition of the book Straight Talk, pamphlets, and newspaper articles relating to Tom Anderson.

Anderson, Tom, 1910-2002

Kate Adele Hill (TAEX) Papers

  • TxAM-CRS C000025
  • Collection
  • 1930-1965

This collection contains the personal papers of Kate Adele Hill during her time as an employee of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Included are correspondence, speeches, clippings, articles, photos about extension work, pioneer women in Texas, demonstration work, and agriculture.

Yolanda Broyles-González and Francisco González Archive

  • TxAM-CRS C000105
  • Collection
  • 1930-2015

The Dr. Yolanda Broyles- González & Francisco González Archive is a rich borderland Mexican-American collection with a focus on performance arts, theater, and music.  Dr. Broyles-González studied and lived in Germany for twelve years, in Berlin, Freiburg, and Hamburg. She published the first translations of Chicano literature into German and she was instrumental in bringing Chicano/a literature and history to European readerships and consciousness. 

Broyles-Gonzalez, Yolanda

Harold Monro Collection

  • US TxAM-C 229
  • Collection
  • 1903-2001

This collection consists of handwritten research notes, correspondence from various individuals, institutions and organizations, and photocopied materials collected by Dominic Hibberd for his 2001 biography Harold Monro: Poet of the New Age. It also includes the papers and research notes of Ruth Tomalin. Alida Monro left Tomalin money to write a biography of Harold Monro, but this was contested by an executor of the will. Though she won her court case, Tomalin did not write the biography, and instead passed her notes to Patric Dickson, another potential biographer, who in turn gave them to Dominic Hibberd. The collection also contains publicity materials and publication information for Hibberd's book.

Monro, Harold, 1879-1932

Department of Journalism Records

  • TxAM-CRS 286
  • Collection
  • 1978-2003

Materials include photographs dating from the 1980s to 2003, a 1997 self-survey, and self-accreditation from 1978.

College of Liberal Arts

William A. Owens Papers, Part One

  • TxAM-CRS 23
  • Collection
  • 1922-1979

This collection contains papers documenting Owens' teaching and writing career from 1928 to 1979. Items of special interest in the collection include lyrics to many folksongs and recordings made by Owens in the 1930s and 1940s of folksingers as well as recorded readings of Robert Frost, interviews of early oil pioneers of Texas, legal papers for Owens vs. Fawcett Publications, Inc. and David Holland concerning True magazine's plagiarism of Slave Mutiny, and letters of Roy Bedichek, J. Frank Dobie, Walter Prescott Webb, and Mody C. Boatright.

The correspondence is further separated into three areas: personal correspondence; correspondence with Owens' literary agent, Maurice Crain; and correspondence regarding Owens' books. Some overlapping exists between these areas. In the personal correspondence section, letters discussing Owens' books are largely from friends and fans and are nontechnical in nature. The correspondence with Maurice Crain concerns the publication procedures and business aspect of his writings while the boxes of letters specifically concerning the books deal primarily with the writing and development of the books.

The personal correspondence is arranged chronologically from 1932 to 1975. The letters are concerned with associations and societies to which Owens belonged; speaking engagements by Owens; programs in which he was involved; awards presented to Owens; and Owens' teaching career which includes letters to Owens as Director of Folk Festivals at the University of Texas, as an instructor at Texas A&M University, and as Professor and Dean of Summer Sessions at Columbia University. Other letters concern Owens' service as an Intelligence Officer in World War II and his early work with folksongs. In addition to correspondence from Owens' family and friends, there are letters congratulating Owens on his publications and requesting his literary advice. Of special interest are letters from famous persons such as Grant Wood, Eleanor Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and Nelson Rockefeller.

Correspondence with Maurice Crain contains letters from 1950 to 1959. The letters discuss publication and promotional plans for Owens' books and short stories. Other subject areas include foreign and domestic contracts for publication, royalty statements, and motion picture plans for several books.

The correspondence concerning books is arranged in chronological order based on the year of the book's publication. Included are letters regarding contracts with publishers, royalty statements, motion picture rights, and lectures on the books. Numerous letters discuss Owens' research and recordings of folksongs for Texas Folk Songs. Additional correspondence with Mrs. Walter B. Sharp, Dudley Sharp, and other oil pioneers refers to the Oral History of Texas Oil Pioneers.

Material concerning Owens' books includes background material, book reviews, typescripts, drafts, and in most cases galley proofs and page proofs. The boxes are arranged chronologically according to the publication date from the earliest to the last. However, the revised edition of Texas Folk Songs which was published in 1976 is included with the papers of the 1950 edition. Labels that Owens used on the papers, such as the numbers of a draft, have been retained, and where there was no designation of a draft number, the typescript is merely labeled typescript, early draft, or manuscript. The papers include both photocopies and ribbon copies and duplicates of typescripts. Typescript and manuscript are used interchangeably as labels.

The evolution of each of Owens' books can be seen through the background material and copies of drafts. In the first folders are Owens' research material and notes, book reviews, advertisements, and other information pertaining to the book in subject matter. Copies of typescripts, from the earliest to the final edited manuscript are next with the last folders containing galley proofs and page proofs. Through the revisions and changes made by Owens in each subsequent draft, the progressive development of notes and a rough outline into a complete and polished publication is revealed. Papers of major interest include a copy of Owens' doctoral dissertation on folksongs for the State University of Iowa (June 1941) with Texas Folk Songs material, the legal papers from the Owens vs. Fawcett Publications, Inc. and David Holland concerning Slave Mutiny, interviews of oil pioneers of Texas with material for Oral History of Texas Oil Pioneers and Walter B. Sharp biography, and the correspondence of Dobie, Bedichek, and Webb revealing their ideas about many varied subjects included with Three Friends material.

Other writings by Owens comprise the next section of the collection. Articles and short stories are filed alphabetically. Book reviews are grouped together in one folder. Speeches are filed last and are labeled with the title or meeting at which they were given and the date if known. Typescripts exist of most of the articles and short stories, and duplicate copies are retained. Some of these writings occur in their published version and are labeled with the title and date of the magazine in which they were printed. The dates of the other stories and articles are unknown. The subjects of Owens' stories and articles cover a wide range of subjects and span the entirety of his writing career. Published excerpts from his books such as This Stubborn Soil and Tales From the Derrick Floor are included in this group as well.

The personal data concerning Owens contains biographical information such as vitae, resumes, publications concerning programs and lectures in which he participated, and material relating to his teaching career. Additional material documents his years at Columbia University and awards presented to him. Newspaper articles and photographs from 1940 to 1974 concern Owens' many interests and involvement in programs as well as his books and teaching career.

The next boxes in the collection contain miscellaneous material kept by Owens. Many oil history photographs and newspapers articles relating to subjects in which Owens was interested are included. Articles by other authors, some signed by the author and some written by friends of Owens, along with magazines and publications collected by Owens are filed in this section. The miscellaneous publications are divided into three categories: literary publications, college publications, and remaining miscellaneous publications. These deal with a wide variety of subjects in which Owens was apparently interested.

The remaining three boxes contain aluminum discs of recordings made by Owens of various folksingers and country people of the South. Note cards listing titles numbered to correspond with the records are filed with the discs. Owens also made recordings of readings by Robert Frost in 1939, and these provide a valuable addition to the collection.

Copies of Owens' books are shelved with the boxed papers. Oversize items including an advertisement for Three Friends: Bedichek, Dobie, Webb, color prints of the Apollo 11 Lunar Mission, and maps and genealogies for A Fair and Happy Land are housed separately in oversize flat storage.

Owens, William A., 1905-1990

Alva Mitchell Collection

  • US TxAM-C 6
  • Collection
  • 1892-1956

The collection is an assortment of newspaper clippings, photographs, a typed biography, commencement programs, an Army training certificate and receipt, and contact information for Ralph Howard Mitchell.

Mitchell, Ralph Howard

Lisa Tuttle Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000181
  • Collection
  • 1959-2013

The Lisa Tuttle Collection consists of books, manuscripts, galley proofs, and magazines tracing the storied career of science fiction, horror and fantasy writer Tuttle.  The collection is a work-in-progress, with additions from the author as they become available.

Tuttle, Lisa

Berenice Napper Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 172
  • Collection
  • 1949-1958

This collection includes an exchange of letters between Berenice Napper and an official of Connecticut's Commission on Civil Rights, six items concerning Napper's membership in the National Council of Negro Women, eight printed ephemeral items including a photograph of Berenice Napper with three other individuals looking over a copy of Walter White's book How Far the Promised Land?, and a small group of newspaper clippings concerning her work as a field secretary for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Napper, Berenice

William Siros Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000233
  • Collection
  • 1975-1995

This is a small collection of correspondence, art, and a manuscript fragment by "Stewart", from Siros. The correspondence consists mostly of convention-related business and other topics and contains letters to Siros from, among others, Philip Jose Farmer, Jack Williamson, and John Clute.

Siros, William

Chad Oliver Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000008
  • Collection

This collection consists of Oliver's manuscripts, notes, and correspondence, published books, magazine appearances, books collecting his stories, foreign-language editions, clippings, and other related material. Chronologically, the collection ranges from the mid-1950s through the mid-1990s.

Oliver, Chad, 1928-1993

Arkham House Collection (August Derleth)

  • TxAM-CRS C000195
  • Collection
  • 1930-1953

The Arkham House Collection consists of correspondence from August Derleth to Howard Wandrei. Derleth, a writer, founded Arkham House to publish and keep in print the work of Howard Phillips Lovecraft, a friend and fellow writer. Lovecraft died in 1937; for the next two years Derleth tried unsuccessfully to find a publisher for Lovecraft's writings. Using money from prepaid orders and the personal investment of Donald Wandrei (brother of Howard Wandrei), Derleth founded Arkham House in 1939. Arkham House published science fiction works by Lovecraft and other writers such as Algernon Blair, Clark Ashton Smith and Henry S. Whitehead.

In his letters to fellow science-fiction writer Howard Wandrei, August Derleth writes about his publishing efforts at Arkham House, his own writing career and the details of his personal life. His letters also mention other authors and publishing houses. The letters date from 1930-1953; most letters are accompanied by the original stamped envelopes.

Derleth, August

Alex Haley Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000012
  • Collection
  • 1949-1965, 1967, 1991

This collection consists of one box of material that includes heavily edited and complete manuscript pages from the Autobiography of Malcolm X, his writings on Mahalia Jackson, Wilma Rudolph, the story Queenie, a follow-up to Roots, and other writings. Also included are his notes regarding the re-run of the mini-series Roots. He mentions a meeting he had with Warren Beatty where they discussed Roots. The notes are titled "Re: Roots Re-Run for TV Guide. Between the Covers acquired the collection from a bookseller who bought it directly from the estate of Virginia Hannon. A group of early letters from Alex Haley it's seven letters sent between 1949-1954 (one from 1967) to close family friend, Virginia Hannon. The letters present Haley, then a journalist in the Coast Guard, trying to get his writing career started and relating thoughts about his working habits, carious siblings, and plans for the future. All letters are written light, optimistic, and sometimes flirtatious style. Accompanying them are several related photographs, including one of Hannon in uniform, and a copy of Haley's posthumous novel Queen inscribed to her by his brother, George.

The July 2015 addendum includes an archive of seven Typed Letters Signed from Alex Haley sent between 1949-1954 (with one from 1967) to a close family friend, along with related photographs and the first edition of Queen Inscribed by his brother George Haley. The letters are overall near fine with typical folds from being mailing and light toning, with their original mailing envelopes that show wear including are nick, tears, and chip, but all are present; the photos are fine. The book is fine in a fine dustwrapper.

The letters, which are signed both as "Alex" and "Palmer," his middle name, were written to Virginia Hannon, a woman who taught Alex Haley French at Alcorn College before he left to join the Coast Guard. The letters begin after he's become a journalist writing for Coast Guard Magazine, and it seems, after an absence from Hannon. The letters are very familiar and playful with references to her French class, updates on his brothers George and Julius, and although married, some flirtatious comments about her breasts, "they were not as you say, spinsterly," and his faraway demeanor in class, "believe me, love, I was not, when you observed me, thinking about any damned touchdowns." There is also lots of talk about Haley's writing career. The early letters from 1949 included his thoughts on his drive to be a writer: "I'm trying pretty hard and have thus far had some minor successes," as well as his bad habits: "I'm essentially lazy, but I love to write once I get started." It's during an extended hospital stay for the treatment of a pilonidal cyst in 1953 that he seems to really make headway: "I never had so much time on end to write in my life. I have to stand up to type, to be sure, but - boy, am I turning out the words! Things I've wanted to work on for ages." In a letter the next year he excitedly describes what was his first big career break: "The prime accomplishment to date, a milestone in my life, I guess, was the sale two weeks ago, of 'The Harlem that Nobody Knows,' a 4,000-word piece, to Reader's Digest ... As a result, I, last week, got taken in the stable of Ruth Aley, probably one of the top 5 literary agents in the country. I am working like a bastard, to put it bluntly." The job led to a series of articles in the magazine and an assignment with Playboy interviewing many of the most important African-Americans of the day. The final letter from 1967 takes the form of two short but sweet holograph notes to Hannon written on the margins of a form letter and a photocopied travel article. They show a busy, successful writer still trying to keep in touch with an old friend.

The letters are accompanied by a black and white photograph of a young Hannon in a military uniform (possibly Red Cross), along with two later color photos of George with Wynelle [Hannon's sister] and George with President Bill Clinton. Plus, there is a copy of Haley's book Queen, published posthumously, and warmly Inscribed by George: "To my dear sister, Virginia Rose Hannon With love, respect and appreciation Your brother George Haley - and all the rest of the Haley Family 12 June 1993." An interesting and intimate collection of early correspondence from one of the most influential African-American writers of the 20th Century.

Haley, Alex

Alfred Elton Van Vogt Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000180
  • Collection
  • 1949-1956; Undated

This collection consists of materials relating to the 1956 A. E. Van Vogt novel Empire of the Atom, including the original typescript, galleys, and correspondence related to the book's publication and review.

Van Vogt, A. E. (Alfred Elton), 1912-2000

Andre Norton Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000276
  • Collection
  • 1950-2002

This collection consists of a small assemblage of Andre Norton's later manuscripts, her review compilations, her portrait, science fiction artworks, and related material.

Norton, Andre

Dave Mellor Texas County Courthouse Research

  • TxAM-CRS 221
  • Collection
  • 1963-2003

This collection includes newspaper clippings, articles, magazines, and brochures about Texas courthouses; pictures and slides of Texas courthouses; calendars; and a video cassette.

Mellor, Dave

Isaac Asimov Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000272
  • Collection
  • 1957-1992

This collection includes an assortment of manuscripts and correspondence of Isaac Asimov, including short stories, novels, non-fiction, and correspondence with publishers. The segment on the submission of "Stay, Oh Fleeting Moment," a nonfiction piece on time and the subsequent correspondence, internal documentation of Playboy editors and readers, and the rejection of the article providing an informative look at the working of a major magazine.

Asimov, Isaac, 1920-1992

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