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H.M.S. Alfred Crew Station Book

  • US TxAM-C C000020
  • Collection
  • circa 1800

This collection contains the crew station book of the H.M.S. Alfred (3rd rate 74, built 1778). Unpaginated [276].

The H.M.S. Alfred was in the harbor for service from 1799 until she was broken up in 1814. This notebook was used for training crews for the Napoleonic wars, and it gives very detailed accounts of the jobs from getting up the anchor, to furling sails.

Alexander Thomson Letter

  • US TxAM-C 37
  • Collection
  • 1832-08-05

The Alexander Thomson letter is dated August 5, 1832, from Texas, Austin's Colony. Addressed to "Mr. Wm. D. Thomson, Giles County, Tennessee, Cornerville P.O.," with the salutation "My dear son," and signed "your Aff. Father, Alexs. Thomson."

The text of the letter recounts recent events in Austin's colony which, in retrospect, have a direct bearing on the brewing struggle for independence of the colony from Mexico. Most noteworthy is the account of the early revolt of Anglo-Texas colonists against the Mexican government's steady encroachment on the freedom of colonists to conduct free trade or encourage further immigration into Texas from the United States.

In the letter, Thomson details the build-up of hostilities between Colonel Juan Davis Bradburn, born in Virginia, but in service to Mexico, who was made commander of Fort Anahuac.

Noteworthy also in the letter are the expressions of loyalty and admiration shown toward General Antonio López de Santa Anna by the colonists, who saw him as championing their rights in the condemnation of Bradburn, who was known to be a supporter of the hated General Anastacio Bustamante. Bustamante, who had been the dictator of Mexico since January 1830, was now involved with Santa Anna and his allies in a fierce civil war. (see general note)

As the Thomson letter records vividly, the Texas colonists threw their support to Santa Anna, believing him to favor their freedom to enforce their own laws and maintain their own system of trade and civil courts. The letter records Stephen Austin's whole-hearted support of Santa Anna and Thomson's encomium on Santa Anna as "a true republican ... determined not to lay down his arms until republicanism prevails," rings ironically optimistic in the face of events only a few years later, culminating in the bitter defeat of the colonists by Santa Anna at the Alamo, and the equally bitter final defeat of Santa Anna at San Jacinto, assuring Texas's independence from Mexico.

Accompanying the letter are three other items.
A sepia-toned picture apparently reproduced from an oil painting. The picture is pasted inside a dark brown oval paper matting on a piece of cardboard measuring about 20 cm by 15 cm. The image measures about 13 cm by 7 cm. Though the original painting is as yet unidentified, "Alexander Thomson" is written on the back of the cardboard in pencil.

A sheet of letterhead stationery for the "St. Louis Southwestern Railway Lines, St. Louis 2, Mo.," with the logo for the "Cotton Belt Route," and below that "F. W. Green, President." On this much-folded piece of letterhead is an undated and unsigned biography of Alexander Thomson handwritten in pencil.

A photocopy (circa 1980) of a booklet originally prepared by Ralston P. Haun in Coleman, Tex. around 1936, which includes a transcription of the August 5, 1832 letter, as well as other family letters and papers. According to the copy of an explanatory note appended to the booklet, dated May 1, 1980, and signed Jim Glass of Houston, Tex., one of the three copies made by Haun was given to Ana Gardner Thomson and passed down to her granddaughter Ana Haun Frómen, thence apparently to Gardner Osborn. The booklet includes transcriptions of five other family letters and two memoirs. Though speculated upon in the Glass note, the current disposition of the other letters and papers is still unverified.

Sans titre

US Passport of John Livezey and Wife

  • US TxAM-C 296
  • Collection
  • 1846

The US Passport of John Livezey and wife, signed by Secretary of State James Buchanan.

Sans titre

Anonymous Journal of the Clipper Ship Stag Hound

  • US TxAM-C 1598
  • Collection
  • 1851

This journal was written by an unknown person on board the clipper ship, Stag Hound with entries dating from January 31 - May 21, 1851, during which the Stag Hound traveled from New York to San Francisco under the command of Captain Josiah Richardson.

Five days out from New York she lost several of her masts, and the crew spent the next several days making repairs. On March 1 they picked up the captain and crew, nine in number, of the Russian brig Sylphide bound from Rio de Janeiro to Helsingfors, Finland. The rescued men landed at Valparaiso when the Stag Hound stopped there for four days to obtain fresh provisions, especially water. While in Valparaiso, many of the crew deserted and had to be replaced.

According to The S. F. Daily Alta Californian from May 26, 1851, the following seven individuals were passengers on board the ship upon its arrival in the harbor: A. F. Macy, Harriet Macy, J. P. Otis, H. R. Helper, J. E. Manning, W. Helman, and W. Mason.

The passenger's experience of frustration usually associated with entering San Francisco on a sailing vessel is apparent in the last few entries. In view of the fact the journalist mentions the name of four of the passengers, A. F. Macy, Harriet Macy, J. P. Ottis, and H. R. Helper, the journalist must be one of the other three, J. E. Manning, W. Helman, or W. Mason. From some of the entries while in Valparaiso, it seems conclusive that the author was from Boston.

The author devoted a considerable amount of space to weather and on each day recorded the latitude and longitude, possibly copied from the ship's logbook kept by the first mate. They gave very little attention to the actual life of the passengers. There are brief references to reading, worship services on Sunday, and a couple of jokes and games. There are also a few references to difficulties in eating during bad weather, but not a thing was written about what they ate. It is mentioned that their cabin got wet a few times, however, there is no mention of what the accommodations were like. Nor was anything written of the fact that there was one female among six male passengers.

William C. Macready Letter

  • US TxAM-C 658
  • Collection
  • 1854

This collection contains one handwritten letter from Macready to "sir" dated 1854 (1-page, ALS with a typed transcription), and another letter to "William Simpson" (1 folio with a typed transcription).

Ackerman and McMiller General Store Account Books

  • US TxAM-C 1031
  • Collection
  • 1854-1856

This collection consists of two large leather account books from the old store owned and operated by David Verplank Ackerman and James McMiller that was at Washington-on-the-Brazos, Texas. The account book labeled "ledger" [box 1] dates from 1855 to 1865 and lists the accounts of individuals while the other one labeled "journal" [box 2] records the chronological expenses beginning in April 1854 and ending in January 1861.

William Clark Manuscript

  • TxAM-CRS 214
  • Collection
  • 1857

This collection consists of Clark's original, handwritten manuscript of "A Trip Across the Plains in 1857" which was published in "The Iowa Journal of History and Politics" as an article, and a xerox copy of a handwritten transcription of the manuscript, due to its age.

Republic of Texas Stock Certificates and Confederate States of America Notes

  • US TxAM-C 261
  • Collection
  • 1838-1862

This collection contains one Treasury Warrant (February 13, 1861), one $100 share in the Consolidated Fund of Texas (September 1, 1837), one $10 treasury note (December 10, 1838), one $100 stock certificate in the 10 percent Consolidated Fund (June 15, 1840), and one $2 Confederate note and a $3 Confederate note (both dated July 7, 1862).

D. Hobart Taylor Diary

  • US TxAM-C 390
  • Collection
  • 1862

This collection contains the original handwritten diary of D. Hobart Taylor from January 1 to May 30, 1862. Taylor was a northern soldier during the Civil War. Also included in a transcription of the diary.

Benjamin M. Linsley Letters

  • US TxAM-C 156
  • Collection
  • 1862-1863

These six letters, dated December 12, 1862 - August 6, 1863, are from Benjamin M. Linsley to his friend Mrs. Lucy G. Palmer in Suffield, Conn. Each letter is written in ink on both sides of a single folded sheet, except for the first one, which is on two folded sheets, sewn together in the center with cloth thread at some point after they were composed. All are addressed by Linsley from the camp near Falmouth, Va., where his regiment, the 14th Infantry of the Army of the Potomac was based, except the last one, which is addressed from McKinnis Hospital in Baltimore, Md., where Linsley was sent to recover from typhoid fever.

In the letters, Linsley comments on the failure of the Union army to obtain substantial victories ever since the Union defeat at Fredericksburg; inflated prices for postage stamps and sutler's goods; the despair he feels at the poor treatment in general of the sick in military hospitals, not only by medical personnel but by fellow soldiers; strategies for obtaining better food and bedding for his brother while nursing him through a severe fever, probably typhoid; the need for statesmen of moral standing more like George Washington than the much clamoured for "little man" George MacClellan; the trials of long marches in either rain and mud to cross the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers, only to retreat back over them after the battle of Chancellorsville, or the intense heat of marches toward Warrenton Junction, Va., from which Linsley was transported with the sick and wounded to recover from typhoid himself in McKinnis Hospital at Baltimore; the desperation of deserters being taken to their punishment; the immoral behaviour of men in camp; the need for more good chaplains like Clay Trumbull of Hartford, Conn., who served with his brother's regiment of Volunteers; and perhaps, more poignantly, the eerie sound of drums during funerals for the many soldiers who died in camp from sickness in their poor living conditions.

The letters are now each encased in a clear plastic sleeve. A one-page report from the National Archives and Records Administration is included with the first letter. This NARA report (2 July 2001) replies to a request made by Professor Dale Baum of Texas A & M University in April 2001 to locate and make a copy of Benjamin M. Linsley's pension documents packet, stating NARA staff could not locate the materials. Baum had listed Linsley as an enlistee of the U.S. Army in Company A, 1st Battalion, 14th U.S. Infantry.

Sans titre

J. F. Rowley Diary

  • US TxAM-C 389
  • Collection
  • 1863-1865

The collection contains the original handwritten diary of southern rebel J. F. Rowley from 1863 to 1865 in a protective engraved box and a transcription of the diary.

George W. Ingram Letters

  • US TxAM-C 1218
  • Collection
  • 1861-1865

This collection contains original letters exchanged between George W. Ingram and his wife, Martha F. Ingram, while George was serving as an officer in the 12th Texas Cavalry during the Civil War. Typed transcripts of the letters are included.

James Samuel Hart Civil War Letters

  • US TxAM-C 1587
  • Collection
  • 1865

This collection contains two letters with transcriptions from James Samuel Hart to Julia Nancy Foster in 1865 along with a brief biography of the two and photocopies of photographs.

Transcriptions of the letters were created and provided by Elaine Matheney Gibson.

John W. Anderson Diary

  • US TxAM-C 16
  • Collection
  • 1861-1866

This collection contains the original diary handwritten as a fair copy by John W. Anderson in 1867, in a notebook made by A. Drury, measuring approximately 24 x 19 cm. The notebook is bound in cardboard, covered in paper, with quarter leather corners and backstrap. Pages are machine ruled in blue, almost all filled with entries handwritten in ink. An albumen photographic print of Richmond before the Civil War is included as a full-page size frontispiece.

An extremely ornate calligraphic title page drawn by Anderson dedicates the diary "To His Beloved Sister, Minnie (Mrs. M. L. Hopkins) ... By John W. Anderson, M.D. 1867." The entries, dated 1861-1866, were copied over in 1867 after the end of the Civil War (1861-1865), from various other journals Anderson kept during the war, as a commemorative record of historical events, including his personal experiences and observations. Sections are enhanced with decorative initial letters and given titles such as "First Year of the War. 1861," with the last section, dated 1866, entitled "Reconstruction."

In the manner of a scrapbook, the journal is profusely illustrated with: pasted in photographs of military and political figures, as well as Anderson family members; pasted in Confederate money and stamps; pen and ink, mostly humorous sketches by John W. Anderson, some hand-colored; hand drawn and colored rebuses, with pasted on, or pen and ink drawn sections; as well as two hand-drawn maps, one showing the First Battle of Bull Run, annotated in red ink with the location of Alabama companies, and of the deathsites for those soldiers well known to Anderson, the other a map in a circular format, showing, at the center, Richmond, Virginia, with roads, railroads and fortifications radiating from or surrounding it. The photographs of family members are particularly interesting as they are included to accompany sketches of the "dramatis personae" of Anderson's narrative.

The original diary pages were numbered 2-300 in pencil on the upper outer corners of each page by Mrs. Robert W. Barnett, whose husband's great-great-grandfather, John W. Anderson had written the diary in 1967, as a fair copy compilation of journals he kept throughout the war and its immediate aftermath.

The original diary is very fragile and housed in a phase box under Restricted access. Permission must be requested from the Cushing Memorial Library Director and an appointment made to view the original diary.

Anderson's reporting skill is evident in the pithy, often vivid diary entries, evidently written by a quite well-educated and informed individual. As a member of the more privileged Southern classes, he is adamantly opposed to what he views as Northern tyranny and does not criticize the institution of slavery. While under siege in Richmond, Va., Anderson and his family, and particularly his fellow soldiers, face hardship in obtaining adequate shelter and food. Although often lighthearted, the entries betray an increasing awareness of the grimness of a drawn-out war and siege on Richmond.

Comments on battles include disparagement of Beauregard's failure to pursue the Federal forces at the battle of Shiloh, as well as mixed evaluations of General John Bell Hood and his Texas Brigade. On a more personal note, during one of Anderson's trips outside of Richmond on business to Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, or Maryland, Anderson's beloved daughter dies. In contrast, there is a charming account of his little boy's birthday party, complete with a pen and ink sketch of the child tearing into a rare treat of a meat pie. The death of a friend, wounded and without the comfort of family, is told without the usual light touch, but full of sympathy.

Events described expressing public opinion on the part of the Southern citizens under besiegement in Richmond include a "bread riot," illustrated with a sketch of women stealing bacon, with one shooting a policeman. Currency values are often mentioned. The flogging of Missouri Representative George Graham Vest by Mrs. Dowell in the House of Representatives is recorded, as is the 1865 New Year's feast prepared by Richmond citizens for the soldiers. After the war, the decision to institute cleaning of the Confederate graves and place flowers on them every 31 May foreshadows the official designation of Memorial Day to commemorate all U. S. soldiers killed in battle.

Also included with the original diary as Item 2. is a black and white photographic copy of the diary pages made by the repository in 1988. This photographic copy includes a few colored enlargements of illustrations in the diary.

Each 8 by 10-inch photograph of a page in the original diary is numbered on the back in pencil. The photographs are inserted in photograph sleeves, two photographs inserted back to back in each sleeve, and bound in three three-ring clamshell box albums holding approximately 50 photograph sleeves each. The black and white photographs of the diary pages are thus divided between the three clamshell box albums, with the colored photographs of selected illustrations added as a group in the back of the third clamshell album box (Item 2. Box 4/album 3). All photograph sleeves clearly bear in print marking pen the Collection ID number and the appropriate page number from the back of the print on the margin of the sleeve.

Negatives for the photographic copy of the diary are included in Box 5, folder 1. As with the photographic prints of the pages, the negatives are also inserted in sleeves and labeled with the Collection ID number and page numbers. The pages were obviously photographed in groups of all "Even" and "Odd," corresponding to recto and verso pages; therefore, the sleeves are labeled with the page numbers and either "Even" or "Odd." It is preferred that this copy of the diary be used as a surrogate copy.

Item 3. of the Diary is a photocopy made on archival quality paper in 2002 of the photographic prints of the original diary. This copy is also suitable for a surrogate copy.

Sans titre

G. A. Ames Diary

  • TxAM-CRS 828
  • Collection
  • 1850-1873

The diary starts with an account of a voyage from Southampton to Barbados on the auxiliary sailing ship "Severn."  The bulk of the diary details the author's life in the new West Indies, the purpose of his visit being a bit obscure, but apparently involved with the building of machinery on the sugar plantations.  The diary makes fascinating reading with great detail about the way of life of the English settlers in mid-19th century West Indie, with much on the social side, including accounts of yachting trips, etc.  The final fifty or so pages include accounts of a voyage to and tour in India and European travels.  The diary concludes with a 20 page log of the voyage of the yacht "Urania," from Cowes to the Mediterranean and back from January through July 1872.

Slavery and Emancipation Documents

  • US TxAM-C C000006
  • Collection
  • 1737-1875

This collection contains 58 items are related to slavery or emancipation in the states of Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and Texas and the countries of Cuba, the Caribbean, Jamaica, and Paris, France.

The descriptive write-up provided by Respess and William Reese, Company is used in the listing of documents. Each document purchased has a title, date, and some have an abbreviated transcription of the text.

The Texas document recounts the hiring, auctions, renting, and transferring ownership of slaves. The Missouri documents concern the purchase and transferring of ownership of slaves named Nancy, George, Phebe, Washington, Lucinda, Madison, Benjamin, and Sarah. No last names or additional information is provided except that Nancy is a Mulatto Woman and George is "of the age of seventeen or thereabouts." Of particular note are two documents, a Texas free woman of color filing a complaint regarding an illegal beating by a group of five men one and the other document is from Missouri and details a sale of slaves by a woman, a rarer document than those recording sales by men.

John Henry Bliler Diary

  • US TxAM-C 97
  • Collection
  • 1862-1875

This diary serves as John Henry Bliler's account of the Civil War. It was kept in the Bliler family, in some form since the Civil War, up until it was acquired by the repository.

It looks that Bliler copied over his original diary several times himself, and this last copy occupies all but a few leaves of the five exercise tablets. As noted in the description of Series 1, these first five exercise books could not possibly have contained a copy made any earlier than 1890. The only exception seems to be a portion of the last tablet, which is filled by entries copied over in pencil in 1944 by one of Bliler's descendants, Ardath Bliler Kelly, reportedly since the family copy had become quite damaged by then.

Thus, according to p. 56 of the typewritten transcript of the diary entries in the five exercise books, "[John Henry] Bliler copied his account of the Civil War three times during his lifetime. The last copy was made shortly before his death in 1924." On page number 116 in pencil in the fifth exercise book, an entry from March 31, 1944, made in different handwriting reads "The following copied from by [sic.] originally by Ardath Bliler Kelly, granddaughter of the narrator [sic.]. The original is ragged and yellowed and crumbling." Entries which are thus copied on p. 116-123 of this last exercise book are out of order, dated June 24, [1865] - June 29, 1865, followed by a note in Ardath Bliler Kelly's hand, "A portion of the original omitted in the copy," then the dates January 24 - January 31, 1865.

The typed transcript and index were probably made by Roy K. Bliler later than 1944, and not too long previous to when it was received by the repository. This transcript preserves the original order of John Henry Bliler's diary entries.

Sans titre

Gathright Hall Gavel

  • US TxAM-C 1316
  • Collection
  • 1876

This collection contains one wooden gavel with a medal inscription reading "Gathright Hall, 1876."

Warrington Penn Portraits

  • US TxAM-C C000576
  • Collection
  • 1848-1876

These two volumes documents feature the personal and political reminiscences of journalist William S. Robinson and were edited and published by his wife in 1877. In the first edition, the first volume was expanded to two with extra illustrations (142 portraits and 53 autograph letters from prominent Americans of the time). Writing as “Warrington,” the journalist was especially noted for his reform positions and radical anti-slavery voice. The portraits and views represent a wide range of 19th-century American historic events, sites, and public figures.

Sans titre

Texas A&M College Student Correspondence Collection

  • US TxAM-C 1197
  • Collection
  • 1877-1878

This collection contains letters written by two A&M College students and general information about the collection. The first two letters are written by David Gordon Miller to his mother in 1877 (folder 2), and tell of Gordon's desire to be with his family at Christmas including a few words about A&M College and life. The third letter (folder 3) was written by E. G. Mills to his sister A. H. Sears on March 30, 1878, with a small section expressing the tedious life of an A&M student at the time.

James Hart Davis Letters

  • US TxAM-C 693
  • Collection
  • 1879

This collection consists of three letters from James Hart Davis, who was attending Texas A&M College at the time, to his sister Martha Powe Davis (great grandmother of the donors for these letters), his father Judge N[athaniel] H[art] Davis, and to his uncle J. R. Davis.

W. R. Cavitt Journal

  • US TxAM-C 1200
  • Collection
  • 1878-1879

This collection consists of a bound journal belonging to William Richard Cavitt from the late 1800s describing his law practice and the Cavitt House in Bryan, TX. Also included is a typed transcript of the journal and notes on it.

Sans titre

Pennybacker's Herbarium

  • US TxAM-C 322
  • Collection
  • 1881

This collection contains 26 botany samples and information compiled by Julian Pennybacker, a student at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas. The herbarium was a class project for a Texas A&M College botany class project in 1881 and the samples were collected in the Brazos Valley.

In November 2003, the herbarium was examined by M. D. Reed of the Texas A&M University Biology Department. She made the following note which is attached to the herbarium:

This was a student collection made for a botany class. Pennybacker appears on student rolls of the era.
The book used to identify the plants was probably something by Asa Gray and not meant to cover Texas. Since there was no complete treatment of the Texas flora at the time, this cannot be considered a fault.
When examined in 2003, the specimens were found to be fragmentary, mixed together, and separated from their sheets. To the extent possible, they were identified, remounted, and databased by Monique Dubrule Reed of the Biology Department Herbarium.

Sans titre

Percy Ives' Walt Whitman Sketch

  • US TxAM-C 1270
  • Collection
  • 1881

Original pencil sketch made in 1881 when Percy Ives, then an art student at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, visited Whitman at his home in Camden, New Jersey.
In 1915 Ives presented the drawing to Powys when the novelist traveled to Detroit, Ives' home town, to begin a series of lectures. Powys subsequently gave the drawing to his sister Philippa, probably after she had visitied Whitman's home in Camden in 1923-1924.

The drawing is signed by both Ives and Whitman. Reframed in 2012 displaying all inscriptions.

Register of State Students at Texas A&M College

  • US TxAM-C 1296
  • Collection
  • 1881-1882

This collection consists of one register notebook containing the students admitted for the 1881-1882 school year at A&M College of Texas. The register includes the name, parent or guardian, post office, birth date, county of residence, and remarks.

Thomas S. Gathright Letters

  • US TxAM-C 1213
  • Collection
  • 1861-1883

This collection includes several letters from Gathright, who was the first president of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (now Texas A&M University), to several different correspondents during his Presidency. Although the writing is not very clear, most of the letters are written to Judge Louis McInnis and the Governor of Mississippi during that time. Some of the letters were transcribed in Early History of Texas A&M College Through Letters and Papers (1952), by David Brooks Cofer.

Louis L. McInnis Scrapbook

  • US TxAM-C 1402
  • Collection
  • 1883-1887

This scrapbook contains material related to the Texas A&M Board of directors, Texas A&M College education between the times 1883-1887.

Sans titre

Matthew Arnold Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 186
  • Collection
  • 1848-1887; Undated

This collection contains 54 original handwritten letters by Arnold, one page of poetry, one page of prose, and two pieces of paper with his signature. Each letter includes a typed transcription within its folder.

Jefferson Davis Letters

  • US TxAM-C 393
  • Collection
  • 1887

This collection contains letters from Jefferson Davis to F.R. Lubbock.

Phil Burne-Jones Letters

  • US TxAM-C 662
  • Collection
  • circa 1887

This collection consists of three handwritten letters from Phil Burne-Jones, dated around 1887. Each letter is addressed separately to the following people: Mrs. Bell (1-page, ALS), Dr. Bird (1 folio), and "Aggie" (1 folio). All letter have their own typed transcription. Also included is a receipt for the sale of Phil's letters (1 page).

Robert Duncan Milne Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000261
  • Collection
  • 1879-1889

This collection consists of a group of thirty issues of The Argonaut (1879-1889) containing twenty-three science-fiction stories by Robert Duncan Milne, some in two or three parts. References to "Moskowitz" indicate his edition of eleven stories by Milne, Into the Sun (West Kingston, RI: Donald M. Grant, Publisher, 1980). Eighteen of the stories in this lot were not published in Moskowitz's edition and have never been reprinted, to the best of our knowledge.

The time period covered in this lot is 1879 to 1889. The Argonaut was generally printed on good, non-pulpy paper and, barring abuse, remains in good condition and can be handled with due care without fear of crumbling paper. The Argonaut was a weekly literary newspaper published in San Francisco starting in 1878 and running well into the 20th century. It contained political commentary as well as departmental reviews of books, drama, food, fashion, etc. Ambrose Bierce wrote weekly columns during the first two and a half years of its existence. The editors had a penchant for weird and fantastic fiction and published such material by W. C. Morrow, Emma Frances Dawson, Robert Duncan Milne and a host of other minor authors, as well as offering translations of European material in this vein. Milne was evidently popular among The Argonaut readers, for his stories are often featured on the front page.

Sans titre

E. W. Carter Herbarium

  • US TxAM-C 1295
  • Collection
  • 1890

This collection consists of 26 plant sample sheets (not all containing plants) with descriptions that had been collected from the area surrounding the Texas A&M campus in Brazos Valley County. The samples were gathered from April 14 to May 28, 1890, by Eugene W. Carter.

In November 2003, M. D. Reed of the Texas A&M University Biology Department repaired and curated the herbarium's botany samples leaving the following note: This collection may have been used as a teaching aid in a Botany class, since E. W. Carter does not appear in student rolls from the period.
These are common plants of the Brazos Co. spring flora. The "analysis" on each sheet is correct and painstakingly thorough. The book used to identify the plants was probably one by Asa Gray not meant for Texas. But since there was no complete treatment for Texas in 1890, this is hardly a fault.

Sans titre

W. P. Ratchford Letters

  • US TxAM-C 1229
  • Collection
  • 1889-1891

This collection contains letters written by W. P. Ratchford to his family in the years between 1889 and 1891, giving details about his life in the dorms and the Corps of Cadets at A&M.

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