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Albert S. Brient Collection

  • US TxAM-C 282
  • Collection

The collection is an assortment of newspaper clippings, photographs, letters, and a typed 'saga' of Albert S. Brient.

Brient, Albert S.

Alex Haley Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000012
  • Collection
  • 1949-1965, 1967, 1991

The Alex Haley Collection consists of one box of material that includes heavily edited and complete manuscript pages from the Autobiography of Malcolm X, his writings on Mahalia Jackson, Wilma Rudolph, the story Queenie, a follow-up to Roots, and other writings. Also included are his notes regarding the re-run of the mini-series Roots. He mentions a meeting he had with Warren Beatty where they discussed Roots. The notes are titled "Re: Roots Re-Run for TV Guide. Between the Covers acquired the collection from a bookseller who bought it directly from the estate of Virginia Hannon. A group of early letters from Alex Haley it's seven letters sent between 1949-1954 (one from 1967) to close family friend, Virginia Hannon. The letters present Haley, then a journalist in the Coast Guard, trying to get his writing career started and relating thoughts about his working habits, carious siblings, and plans for the future. All letters are written light, optimistic, and sometimes flirtatious style. Accompanying them are several related photographs, including one of Hannon in uniform, and a copy of Haley's posthumous novel Queen inscribed to her by his brother, George.

The July 2015 addendum includes an archive of seven Typed Letters Signed from Alex Haley sent between 1949-1954 (with one from 1967) to a close family friend, along with related photographs and the first edition of Queen Inscribed by his brother George Haley. The letters are overall near fine with typical folds from being mailing and light toning, with their original mailing envelopes that show wear including are nick, tears, and chip, but all are present; the photos are fine. The book is fine in a fine dustwrapper.

The letters, which are signed both as "Alex" and "Palmer," his middle name, were written to Virginia Hannon, a woman who taught Alex Haley French at Alcorn College before he left to join the Coast Guard. The letters begin after he's become a journalist writing for Coast Guard Magazine, and it seems, after an absence from Hannon. The letters are very familiar and playful with references to her French class, updates on his brothers George and Julius, and although married, some flirtatious comments about her breasts, "they were not as you say, spinsterly," and his faraway demeanor in class, "believe me, love, I was not, when you observed me, thinking about any damned touchdowns." There is also lots of talk about Haley's writing career. The early letters from 1949 included his thoughts on his drive to be a writer: "I'm trying pretty hard and have thus far had some minor successes," as well as his bad habits: "I'm essentially lazy, but I love to write once I get started." It's during an extended hospital stay for the treatment of a pilonidal cyst in 1953 that he seems to really make headway: "I never had so much time on end to write in my life. I have to stand up to type, to be sure, but - boy, am I turning out the words! Things I've wanted to work on for ages." In a letter the next year he excitedly describes what was his first big career break: "The prime accomplishment to date, a milestone in my life, I guess, was the sale two weeks ago, of 'The Harlem that Nobody Knows,' a 4,000-word piece, to Reader's Digest ... As a result, I, last week, got taken in the stable of Ruth Aley, probably one of the top 5 literary agents in the country. I am working like a bastard, to put it bluntly." The job led to a series of articles in the magazine and an assignment with Playboy interviewing many of the most important African-Americans of the day. The final letter from 1967 takes the form of two short but sweet holograph notes to Hannon written on the margins of a form letter and a photocopied travel article. They show a busy, successful writer still trying to keep in touch with an old friend.

The letters are accompanied by a black and white photograph of a young Hannon in a military uniform (possibly Red Cross), along with two later color photos of George with Wynelle [Hannon's sister] and George with President Bill Clinton. Plus, there is a copy of Haley's book Queen, published posthumously, and warmly Inscribed by George: "To my dear sister, Virginia Rose Hannon With love, respect and appreciation Your brother George Haley - and all the rest of the Haley Family 12 June 1993." An interesting and intimate collection of early correspondence from one of the most influential African-American writers of the 20th Century.

Haley, Alex

Alexander Thomson Letter

  • US TxAM-C 37
  • Collection
  • 1832-08-05

The Alexander Thomson letter is dated August 5, 1832, from Texas, Austin's Colony. Addressed to "Mr. Wm. D. Thomson, Giles County, Tennessee, Cornerville P.O.," with the salutation "My dear son," and signed "your Aff. Father, Alexs. Thomson."

The text of the letter recounts recent events in Austin's colony which, in retrospect, have a direct bearing on the brewing struggle for independence of the colony from Mexico. Most noteworthy is the account of the early revolt of Anglo-Texas colonists against the Mexican government's steady encroachment on the freedom of colonists to conduct free trade or encourage further immigration into Texas from the United States.

In the letter, Thomson details the build-up of hostilities between Colonel Juan Davis Bradburn, born in Virginia, but in service to Mexico, who was made commander of Fort Anahuac.

Noteworthy also in the letter are the expressions of loyalty and admiration shown toward General Antonio López de Santa Anna by the colonists, who saw him as championing their rights in the condemnation of Bradburn, who was known to be a supporter of the hated General Anastacio Bustamante. Bustamante, who had been the dictator of Mexico since January 1830, was now involved with Santa Anna and his allies in a fierce civil war. (see general note)

As the Thomson letter records vividly, the Texas colonists threw their support to Santa Anna, believing him to favor their freedom to enforce their own laws and maintain their own system of trade and civil courts. The letter records Stephen Austin's whole-hearted support of Santa Anna and Thomson's encomium on Santa Anna as "a true republican ... determined not to lay down his arms until republicanism prevails," rings ironically optimistic in the face of events only a few years later, culminating in the bitter defeat of the colonists by Santa Anna at the Alamo, and the equally bitter final defeat of Santa Anna at San Jacinto, assuring Texas's independence from Mexico.

Accompanying the letter are three other items.
A sepia-toned picture apparently reproduced from an oil painting. The picture is pasted inside a dark brown oval paper matting on a piece of cardboard measuring about 20 cm by 15 cm. The image measures about 13 cm by 7 cm. Though the original painting is as yet unidentified, "Alexander Thomson" is written on the back of the cardboard in pencil.

A sheet of letterhead stationery for the "St. Louis Southwestern Railway Lines, St. Louis 2, Mo.," with the logo for the "Cotton Belt Route," and below that "F. W. Green, President." On this much-folded piece of letterhead is an undated and unsigned biography of Alexander Thomson handwritten in pencil.

A photocopy (circa 1980) of a booklet originally prepared by Ralston P. Haun in Coleman, Tex. around 1936, which includes a transcription of the August 5, 1832 letter, as well as other family letters and papers. According to the copy of an explanatory note appended to the booklet, dated May 1, 1980, and signed Jim Glass of Houston, Tex., one of the three copies made by Haun was given to Ana Gardner Thomson and passed down to her granddaughter Ana Haun Frómen, thence apparently to Gardner Osborn. The booklet includes transcriptions of five other family letters and two memoirs. Though speculated upon in the Glass note, the current disposition of the other letters and papers is still unverified.

Thomson, Alexander, 1785-1863

Andre Norton Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000276
  • Collection
  • 1950-2002

This collection consists of a small assemblage of Andre Norton's later manuscripts, her review compilations, her portrait, science fiction artworks, and related material.

Norton, Andre

Angela Y. (Yvonne) Davis Collection

  • US TxAM-C 20
  • Collection
  • 1971; Undated

The collection consists of written correspondence primarily in the form of postcards, handmade cards, or other support materials from individuals in Germany. Many of the postcards have colored flowers and colorful artwork, some are from mechanical postcards distributed to school children and individuals in Germany to write in support of Angela Davis. These cards and correspondence are in response to a solidarity campaign of support called "A Million Roses for Angela Davis" started in East Germany. Some of the postcards are addressed to Marin County Courthouse in California and others are addressed to the United National Committee to Free Angela Davis in New York.

Davis, Angela Y., 1944

Archive of World War I German and Austrian Documents

  • US TxAM-C 92
  • Collection
  • 1883-1960

This archive consists of over 2,600 items to and from German military men writing to family and friends including letters, postcards, diaries, ID booklets, passports, maps, metal ID tags, drawings, and photographs (loose and in albums) including those of German soldiers in uniform, landscapes, gravesites and other imagery, newspaper clipping. The materials within are written in German, from German soldiers all around Europe during the war, writing primarily to their families. This collection also contains a handwritten book by Eugen Bechler about the German Navy.

Ardath Mayhar Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000262
  • Collection
  • 1970-2004

This collection includes manuscripts, papers, and publications from throughout Mayhar's career, but the bulk of the material dates from the late 1980s to the present.

Mayhar, Ardeth

Arkham House Collection (August Derleth)

  • US TxAM-C C000195
  • Collection
  • 1930-1953

The Arkham House Collection consists of correspondence from August Derleth to Howard Wandrei. Derleth, a writer, founded Arkham House to publish and keep in print the work of Howard Phillips Lovecraft, a friend and fellow writer. Lovecraft died in 1937; for the next two years Derleth tried unsuccessfully to find a publisher for Lovecraft's writings. Using money from prepaid orders and the personal investment of Donald Wandrei (brother of Howard Wandrei), Derleth founded Arkham House in 1939. Arkham House published science fiction works by Lovecraft and other writers such as Algernon Blair, Clark Ashton Smith and Henry S. Whitehead.

In his letters to fellow science-fiction writer Howard Wandrei, August Derleth writes about his publishing efforts at Arkham House, his own writing career and the details of his personal life. His letters also mention other authors and publishing houses. The letters date from 1930-1953; most letters are accompanied by the original stamped envelopes.

Derleth, August

Berenice Napper Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 172
  • Collection
  • 1949-1958

This collection includes an exchange of letters between Berenice Napper and an official of Connecticut's Commission on Civil Rights, six items concerning Napper's membership in the National Council of Negro Women, eight printed ephemeral items including a photograph of Berenice Napper with three other individuals looking over a copy of Walter White's book How Far the Promised Land?, and a small group of newspaper clippings concerning her work as a field secretary for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Napper, Berenice

Bernard Sbisa Family Collection

  • US TxAM-C 1377
  • Collection
  • 1877-1919

The Bernard Sbisa Family Collection consists of photographic scrapbooks, personal correspondence, photographs of the Sbisa Family, and early Texas A&M College photographs along with other early college photographs of the campus of Perdue. The items included either have no date or are dated from between 1877 to 1919.

Bernard Sbisa was one of the first Texas A&M College professors who lived and taught the early Texas A&M College.

Sbisa, Bernard

Bill Crider Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000212
  • Collection
  • 1987

The collection spans Bill Crider's entire career. A near-complete run of manuscripts traces his writing career, supplemented by a correspondence file, miscellaneous material, and books and magazines. A long run of "DAPA-EM," the organ of a mystery writer's amateur press association completes the collection.

Crider, Bill

Cavitt Family Papers

  • US TxAM-C 805
  • Collection
  • circa 1870s-post-1900s

The collection consists of personal correspondence and documents of J. F. Cavitt and other documents of significant importance. Included is the correspondence of and articles about Ann Cavitt Armstrong, that sheds a light on the early settlement period of Texas. Financial documents also shed a light on the early history of Texas, including court documents and receipts of slave purchases.

Cavitt, Joseph Franklin

Chad Oliver Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000008
  • Collection

This collection consists of Oliver's manuscripts, notes, and correspondence, published books, magazine appearances, books collecting his stories, foreign-language editions, clippings, and other related material. Chronologically, the collection ranges from the mid-1950s through the mid-1990s.

Oliver, Chad, 1928-1993

Charles Criner Papers and Art Collection

  • US TxAM-C 228
  • Collection
  • 1960-2009

This collection documents Criner's professional and personal life as an artist and educator. The collection includes correspondence, original works of art, prints, drawings, exhibition photos, postcards, writings, photographs, publicity, news clippings, interviews with Criner, and thank you letters and cards from students and visitors who have been taught the art of printmaking and provided tours of the Museum of Printing History in Houston by Criner. The collection includes a number of Criner's prints and copies of his art reproduced as advertisements, exhibits, and prints. Of particular note are the significant examples of Criner’s various cartoons, Johnny Jones, The Job Crowd, The Dogs, and a few others. These were all produced from his stint in the Army, his work with the Houston Post, Houston Chronicle, HUD, and his collaboration with William Henry Hygh. 

A listing of Criner’s artwork and cartoons is included at the end of the finding guide. The collection includes examples of each of these works either in print, photos, or exhibit material.

Criner, Charles

Citizens' Fellowship Papers Collection

  • US TxAM-C 85
  • Collection
  • 1951-1967; 1994; Undated

This collection predominantly dates from 1958 to 1961 and includes correspondence to and from members of the Citizens' Fellowship, notes, minutes from meetings, and newspaper clippings. There are items regarding the integration of public schools, including the A&M Consolidated Independent School District. The collection contains information regarding the issue of African American employment and community programs sponsored by the Citizens' Fellowship.

Fenner, James H.

Clyde McQueen Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000045
  • Collection
  • 1944-1999

This collection consists of the research collection McQueen built and used to write Black Churches in Texas. A Guide to Historic Congregations (Texas A&M University Press, 2000).

The contents consist mainly of "Texas County Historical Black Church" information sheets, each listed as an "inventory" in the finding guide, accompanied by related church history materials including church worship service programs, also called orders of worship; church homecoming and anniversary publications; handwritten and typed letters mostly regarding church history; newspaper clippings about historic congregations and members; notes about the history and location of churches and contact persons in congregations; business cards for contacts; published church histories; photocopies from published books about related counties, cities, and congregations; Texas county maps; color slides, photographic prints and negatives of church cornerstones, existing church buildings, Texas Historical Markers, and congregation members.

Also present are photocopies of newspaper clippings covering African American religious issues and manuscript drafts for McQueen's book, many of which are heavily annotated by McQueen.

The inventories and related church history materials were amassed by data collection teams organized by McQueen and also collected by McQueen himself. Norris Braly, a member of the Burleson County Historical Committee, documented the first church history in February 1988. McQueen documented the last congregation on August 24, 1997.

Most of the church worship service programs are laser printed. However, there are a few earlier documents that are photocopies of mimeographed sheets, and a few that were professionally printed. When the word "typed" is used to describe a church history, it means that the history was not professionally printed.

Variant congregation names exist within the documents (for example, Macedonia First Baptist Church and Macedonia Baptist Church). For the purpose of this finding guide, we have chosen to use the form of the congregation name given in Black Churches in Texas. Files exist within the collection for congregations that do not appear in Black Churches in Texas because exact organization dates could not be determined at the time of publication. Conversely, not every church listed in McQueen's book has a folder in the collection (for example Colored Methodist Episcopal Church of Sweeny in Brazoria County).

McQueen used different versions of the inventory form to document the churches. Though the information requested is the same, the format may differ. McQueen also copyrighted many of his slides, and so most of them bear handwritten copyright information.

McQueen, Clyde, 1926

Dave Mellor Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 220
  • Collection
  • 1957-2004

This collection contains correspondence to Dave Mellor from the Lewis and Clark Heritage Foundation, an organization whose members are dedicated scholars of the Corps of Discovery's expedition to map the Louisiana Purchase. Other items also originating from that organization are copies of their member's only journal "We Proceeded On", foundation notes from meetings, and plans for the annual gathering of all the members (usually at a location pertinent to the Lewis and Clark expedition in some way), newsletters informing members of upcoming activities.

Aside from the material from the Heritage Foundation, there are also pamphlets from various tourist sites located on the trail; some are actual locations the Corps of Discovery passed by (Pompey's Pillar, the Lolo Trail, Fort Clatsop), whereas others are cities and towns located near these historic locations. Others are simply named for the explorers (Lewis and Clark Lake), and others relate to the Native Americans the Corps of Discovery encountered on their journey (Big Hole Battlefield, a site sacred to the Nez Perce). A number of magazine articles on the expedition are included, topics cover such as the environmental impact on some of the historic sites, Meriwether Lewis's death, Sacagawea's biography, and later, her gold dollar coin, Thomas Jefferson, both about his shrewdness in making the Louisiana Purchase and the controversy surrounding his relationship with his slave Sally Hemings, descendants of Lewis, Clark, and other members of the Corps of Discovery meeting together to travel the Expedition trail on the 200th Anniversary of the Expedition, and the plight of the Columbia River. Most of the remaining material is a re-hash of all of these topics, save for a couple of unique articles (including a biographical account of Sacagawea's son, Jean-Baptiste Charbonneau).

Mellor, Dave

Department of Journalism Records

  • TxAM-CRS 286
  • Collection
  • 1978-2003

Materials include photographs dating from the 1980s to 2003, a 1997 self-survey, and self-accreditation from 1978.

College of Liberal Arts

Dolores Richter Collection

  • US TxAM-C 181
  • Collection

This collection was part of a gift given to the library by the Anthropology Department.  The collection documents the work and writings of Professor Dolores Richter. The collection includes photographs, negatives, writings, and news clippings related to Prof. Richter’s research in the Ivory Coast, West Africa, and Oceania and the publication of her book “Arts, Economics and Change: the Kulebele of Northern Ivory Coast” published in 1980.

Richter, Dolores

Dr. Gwendoline Y. Fortune Papers

  • US TxAM-C 2515959
  • Collection
  • 1983-2014

This collection consists of volumes of correspondence (bulk 2005-2014), video and audiotapes of Dr. Fortune's classical music performances, writings, business ventures, and research material for her published books.

Fortune, Gwendoline Y.

E. B. Long Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 157
  • Collection
  • 1949-1981

This collection consists of personal correspondence, manuscripts by Long and others, articles, booklets, essays, clippings, photocopies, research notes, maps, brochures, and photographs. The papers reflect Long's successful career as a Civil War historian and are in very good condition for the most part.

While most of the materials in this collection are dated in the twentieth century, there are several original Civil War documents of the nineteenth century. Of further interest are the drafts of Allan Nevins's Ordeal of the Union, which were edited by E. B. Long, and the nine long index boxes of Long's research notes on the Civil War.

The papers have been divided into the following categories: personal correspondence, manuscripts by Long, manuscripts by others, general files covering a wide range of subjects, drafts of Allan Nevins' Ordeal of the Union, research notes on the Civil War, index card files of articles, and miscellaneous volumes of clippings. The correspondence is arranged both chronologically for general correspondence and alphabetically for correspondence with specific individuals, resulting in some overlapping of dates. Correspondents include Bruce Catton, the Civil War Round Table, Doubleday and Company, Allan Nevins, Lowell Reedinbaugh, and John Y. Simon. Other materials in the collection are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically depending on the nature of the information.

Long, E.B., 1919-1981

E. J. Kyle Papers

  • US TxAM-C 15
  • Collection
  • 1902-1957

The E. J. Kyle (1894-1957) Papers contains reports, correspondence, speeches, articles, applications, pamphlets, newspaper clippings, programs, pictures, memorandums, lists, and resolutions. Materials include correspondence, reports, speeches, and articles on E. J. Kyle's attempts to acquire more land and construct new buildings for the School of Agriculture at Texas A & M College. Other speeches and articles written by E. J. Kyle are concerned with subjects as cotton, soil conservation, and the cultivation of vegetables, fruits and nuts, particularly pecans.

Also present are reports Kyle wrote pertaining to Texas A & M College's enrollment plans and teaching techniques in Agricultural classes. Since Kyle was the head of many different programs at Texas A & M College, his papers contain applications and other information regarding the Land Prize, Anderson-Clayton Company Scholarship, and programs on Short Courses taught from 1913 to 1936. In addition to his academic duties, Kyle was also deeply involved with various types of research and the papers contain a few of the booklets, articles, and resolutions pertaining to the Soil Erosion Project, Frozen Food Research, and Texas Wildlife Research.

Correspondence in the papers deals with not only E. J. Kyle's work, but also contains letters from former students, commendations sent to Kyle, and letters concerning the naming of Kyle Field sports arena on the Texas A & M College campus.

Photographs contained in the collection are pertain to agricultural topics, such as cattle and pecan trees, the NYA program, Texas A & M College buildings, Texas A & M College football teams and sports events, and Kyle Field.Several football team rosters, programs from football games, newspaper clippings about sports events, and correspondence dealing with Kyle's position on the Athletic Council represent Kyle's close connection with many of the Texas A & M College athletics program.

Also present is a certificate of Kyle's appointment to the Farm Credit Association.

Kyle, E.J., 1876-1963

E. M. "Buck" Schiwetz Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 312
  • Collection

This collection contains letters, magazine and newspaper articles, magazines, prints, and other materials documenting the work of artist Edward Muegge "Buck" Schiwetz, as both a commercial and fine artist.

His sketches and watercolors are featured in a vast majority of the print material in the collection, from Christmas cards to sketchbooks to fine prints.

Rather than focusing on Schiwetz's life and his time at Texas A&M, the collection pays most attention to his art career and people's opinion of Schiwetz as an artist in the traditional sense of the definition.

E. M. Arnold, MD Travel Diaries

  • US TxAM-C 1160
  • Collection
  • 1936-1939

This collection includes a travel diary of E.M. Arnold, MD, documenting his journey through Mexico, Canada, and the United States during 1936-1939.

Edward Everett Papers

  • US TxAM-C C000024
  • Collection
  • 1846-1906

The Edward Everett Papers (1846-1906 (bulk: 1846-1847) consist chiefly of handwritten letters, journal entries, a memoir, a proof copy of a report from the U. S. Secretary of War on Army operations in Texas and on the Rio Grande during the Mexican War (1846-1848), as well as plans, maps and nine hand-colored copies of lithographic engravings drawn by Everett, which vividly chronicle southwest Texas cultural as well as military history during the late1840s.

Series 1. Letters (1847-1863) are mainly letters handwritten in ink by Edward Everett to his brother, Samuel W. Everett, from 1846-1847, while Everett was serving in San Antonio de Bexar with the U. S. Army during the Mexican War. A few letters from other correspondents pertain to Everett's disability and eventual official discharge from the Army. Three letters written in the period 1852-1863 are about business or from family members.

Series 2. Journal and Memoir (1846-1899) contain three sets of journal entries for Sept. 1846-Jan. 1847. All are handwritten in ink on loose sheets of paper. The memoir, also handwritten in ink, on machine ruled paper measuring about 8 x 5 inches, covers the years 1846-1848, with additional material added and dated, on at least one page, with 1899. This memoir is edited in pencil by Everett, evidently for publication, since one note suggests that the memoir was donated in 1899 to the Quincy Historical Society, later known as The Illinois Historical Society. The memoir was actually published, at least part, or possibly all of it, under the title "Military Experience," in Transactions of the Illinois Historical Society for 1905.

Series 3. Engravings, Maps, and Plans (ca. 1846-1849) includes nine copies of lithographed illustrations drawn by Edward Everett and engraved by C. B Graham Lithographers in Washington, D.C. The engravings were to be published in a report on U.S. Army operations in Texas during the Mexican War. A proof copy of this 67-page report, titled Report of the Secretary of War, communicating ... the Operations of the Army of the United States in Texas and the Adjacent Mexican states on the Rio Grande (31st Congress, 1st Session, Senate. Executive Document 32), published in 1850, is annotated throughout by Everett in pencil. For this publication Everett was at least responsible for eight illustrations: seven engravings of the San Antonio de Bexar area, including the Alamo church, as well as locations in Mexico; a plan of the ruined Alamo as it was in 1846, before being renovated according to Everett's direction, as a U. S. Army supply depot and workshops.

Engravings include nine copies of the lithographed prints. Notations made in ink on the separate prints, and on p. [4] of the proof copy of the published government report, indicate that: illustrations numbered for publication as 2, 3-6 were engraved from original drawings made by Everett; those numbered 1, 7-8 were engraved from drawings made by Everett based on pencil sketches by other individuals, particularly no. 1 titled "Watch Tower Near Monclova," which was drawn by Everett from a sketch by Lieutenant McDowell of the U.S. Army.

Everett's proofs of the lithographic prints have all been exquisitely hand-tinted, in contrast to the severe black and white reproductions in the printed report. Of the nine hand-colored prints, two are duplicates of two illustrations, one titled "Church Near Monclova," the other "Watch Tower Near Monclova." These identical prints are each hand-colored in two versions, apparently to represent the depicted buildings' appearances during the day time, as well as at dusk or sunset.

Maps include one copy of a published map, possibly also by Everett, though it has been attributed to Josiah Gregg, which also appeared in the 1850 Army Operations report, titled "Map Showing the Route of the Arkansas Regiment from Shreveport La. to San Antonio de Bexar Texas," which is annotated with a penciled in route drawn from San Antonio to Austin, and a town location labeled "New Braunsfels." Also included are two manuscript versions of a map by Edward Everett, one copy titled "Plan of the Vicinity of Austin and San Antonio, Texas."

Plans are represented by two copies of an illustration drawn by Everett for the 1849 Army operations report showing plans of the Alamo before the renovation, titled "Plans of the Ruins of the Alamo near San Antonio De Bexar, 1846." Also present is one manuscript plan, titled "Plan of San Antonio de Bexar, Texas, 1848," which is labeled as "Drawn from recollection by E. E." The legend states that locations number 1-5 on the plan show, for instance, the spot near the Plaza in town where Everett received his disabling gunshot wound in the leg, the Hospital where he convalesced, and the Quartermaster's Office, to which he was assigned to work after being declared disabled from active service in the field.

A handwritten loose-leaf page kept with the proof copy of the report is titled "Index to Col. Hughes Report," and lists subject divisions and page numbers, though these divisions are not present in the published report by Hughes.

Thus Everett's accounts of frontline actions in the Mexican War mainly rely on reports from occasional volunteer soldiers or scouts, or Mexican nationals, returning back to Texas from the front lines of battle in Mexico. As much as he is able, however, Everett produces very detailed accounts of the various battles and skirmishes in and around the Texas-Mexico border, including battles at Monterrey, Saltillo, San Luis, Camargo, Buena Vista, Vera Cruz, and Tampico, recording a large number of casualties on both sides.

Of particular interest is Everett's extensive first-hand description of the ruins of the Alamo, and how it was converted for U.S. Army use as a military headquarters, according to plans drawn up by Everett. He deplores the vandalism already wreaked by relic seekers and stressed the respect shown to the mission church by the U. S. Army restorers, who refused to plunder it for building stone but instead merely cleaned away the debris. In the process, skeletons were uncovered, which Everett assumes to be from the time of the siege and Battle of the Alamo in 1836. Everett's accounts of frontier life in the rather rambunctious confines of San Antonio, complete with ambushes, shootouts, rough and ready court trials, and various local characters is often riveting.

Everett also pictures the moods and attitudes of the soldiers toward a variety of issues. Everett describes their arduous marches, unsavory living conditions, often dire medical care, and the cruel climate tormenting them. Having been left behind in San Antonio with all the stores rejected by the army, which had proceeded on into Mexico, Everett's men were faced with nursing broke down mules and horses back to usefulness, salvaging wagon parts from several damaged ones to make a serviceable one, and generally, trying to make do with what could be had in the vicinity, or easily transported from the Quartermaster at New Orleans.

According to Everett, communications on the Texas frontier often proceeded through "solitary express riders." He describes Mexican culture co-existing with "the Indians" and their horse-stealing. He also gives an excellent but pejorative account of the Texas Rangers and their activities, calling them desperados. Everett describes Mexican Generals Santa Anna, Torrejón and Woll, the exceedingly unpopular U. S. Army Colonel Churchill, officers George W. Hughes, 1st Lieutenant W. B. Franklin, 2nd Lieutenant F. T. Bryan, General Zachary Taylor ("Old Rough and Ready"), General Winfield Scott, and General James Morgan, Captain J. H. Prentiss, Brigadier General John E. Wool, Major General Worth, Captain James Harvey Ralston, Captain L. Sitgreaves, as well as Edward Everett's own two brothers Charles Everett and Samuel W. Everett (Sam).

Full of absorbing narrative and elusive details often lost in larger historical works, the content of Everett's narratives and letters may be summed up in his own words from the handwritten memoir: "Mine is not a tale of battles, or of the movements of great armies, but the details will show some of the hardships and vicissitudes of a soldier's life, the exposure to which causes a greater sacrifice of life than that ensuing from wounds of death received from the enemy."

Everett, Edward

Edward Thomas Papers

  • US TxAM-C 275
  • Collection
  • 1902-circa 1965

This collection consists of letters written by or about Edward Thomas, an English author, and one manuscript of a foreword written by his wife, Helen Thomas. The subject of each one varies from Edward Thomas' death, a rejection letter for a short story he later published elsewhere, to general correspondence with a photographer friend, Frederick Evans, and Mrs. Thomas' foreword which was added to a new edition of her then-late husband's children's book, Four-and-Twenty Blackbirds.

The collection came with detailed notes on each item, as well as a transcription of what is written on the original pieces of paper. Thus, it was copied to this finding guide, as a helpful aid to deciphering the handwriting.

Thomas, Edward, 1878-1917

Eldridge Cleaver Archives

  • US TxAM-C C000011
  • Collection
  • 1959-1981

Eldridge Cleaver, a founding member of the Black Panther Party, was also an author, Black power activist, who in his later life became a patriot and Mormon.

The Eldridge Cleaver Archives contains over 1000 individual items of his writings and letters from his prison stints from 1959 to 1966 after he published his seminal work, “Soul on Ice;” BPP writings, his exile in Cuba, Algiers, Paris and other writings; newspapers and other publications. The collection contains rare and unique items from founding members and insider within one of the most notorious and progressive organizations this country has ever witnessed.

There is extensive correspondence from his wife Kathleen that includes correspondence written by and to her, writings to and correspondence from journalists, activists, and from friends.

Cleaver, Eldridge, 1935-1998

Eugene Butler Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 101
  • Collection
  • 1924-1987; Undated

This collection includes speeches, editorials, and articles written by Eugene Butler, dating from 1927 through 1987. These documents deal with a broad spectrum of issues of the day from Prohibition to bussing but focus primarily on agricultural topics.

Also contained in the collection are many Progressive Farmer articles and editorials, as well as correspondence. There are three complete issues of the magazine in the collection; one oversize and two in folders.

Other items in the collection include extensive material on the Progressive Farmer Company, cotton, and the Progressive Farmer Master Farm Family Award and individual winners.

Butler, Eugene

Francis C. Turner Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 38
  • Collection
  • 1929-1997

This collection represents 68 years of materials authored or collected by Turner. Series 1. through Series 4. include highway engineering reports written for the Bureau of Public Roads, Clay Committee papers dating from the 1950s hearings on the development of a national interstate highway program, and speeches, publications, correspondence, and research notes generated by his career as a federal highway official. The aforementioned inscribed copy of A More Beautiful America by Lyndon Baines Johnson is is included in this material.

Upon his retirement, Turner became a transportation consultant, advising local, national, and international agencies, associations, and companies on transportation issues. The bulk of these post-retirement and consulting materials are found in Series 5 through Series 9. These materials include maps, photographs, research notes and manuscript drafts for a three-year study he and Harmer E. Davis conducted for the International Road Federation. The study, published in 1977 and titled A Comparative Analysis of Urban Transportation Requirements, compares transportation needs in urban areas in fourteen countries, including the United States.

Another large portion of the papers found in Series 7. contains papers related to Turner's membership in various associations. Throughout his lifetime Turner remained devoted to groups such as the Highway Users Federation and the American Association of State Highway Officials. Correspondence, speeches, and conference notes related to these associations reflect his continued involvement in the transportation field almost until the year of his death.

The collection also includes correspondence, transcripts, and drafts of several reports recording the history of the interstate highway, a subject for which Turner was a popular informant. The most extensive project is a study by the Public Works Historical Society, commissioned by the American Public Works Association and the American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials.

Turner, Francis, 1908-1999

General Alvord Van Patten Anderson Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 14
  • Collection
  • 1886-1976

The General Alvord Van Patten Anderson Papers, 1886-1976, contain many letters from Alvord Anderson to his father, John R. Anderson, and his wife, Cora Anderson. The nineteenth century letters are handwritten, while the twentieth century letters are typed, with the exception of the World War I letters.

Throughout the collection, some letters are annotated in pencil with dates, page numbers, and names of recipients. This added information is contradicted by information in the letters themselves in one or two cases. A few undated or incompletely dated letters have been arranged according to the approximate date.

Letters in Series 1. are sometimes accompanied by other materials, such as military papers, reports, citations of awards, newsletters, black and white photographic prints, newspaper clippings, a poem, an essay, and a map.Series 2 consists of a scrapbook of photographic prints and postcards, and Series 3. Published monographs collected by Anderson, 1905-1966, icludes 8 monographs which are cataloged and housed seperately in the repository's stacks.

  • “Partially processed. Might not be available to patrons. Please contact the Cushing Library’s Reading Room for more information.”

Anderson, Alvord van Patten, 1872-1951

General Walter Krueger Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 160
  • Collection
  • 1943-1945

This collection includes copies of administrative orders, field orders, and weekly reports compiled by the staff of the Sixth Army and sent to General Krueger, as well as copies of operation reports sent from General Krueger to the Adjutant General in Washington, D. C. Also included are after-action operation reports concerning the 6th Army.

The administrative orders primarily contain data or amendments to accompany Field Orders and are concerned with supply, evacuation, traffic, service troops, personnel, prisoners of war, and miscellaneous items. Also included are instructions and annexes dealing with captured enemy equipment, individual clothing and equipment, supply, burials and cemeteries, native labor, sanitation, prisoners of war and enemy dead, captured material trophies, air supply circulars, and plans of operation. Maps and sketches are also found among the administrative orders.

The field orders contain data and instructions relating to hostile dispositions and support of operations, task forces, command posts, supplies, and communications. Also included are annexes concerned with staging, loading and embarkation plans, intelligence, artillery and antiaircraft artillery, communications, and engineering. Maps, sketches, and code names are also included in the field orders.

The weekly reports contain intelligence information on enemy activities, terrain, counterintelligence, material and equipment, captured documents and POW interrogations, reclassification of documents, enemy tactics, psychological warfare, and code names and numbers. Also included are photographic coverage reports, sketches, and maps.

The operation reports provide the history of the operation, including organization and operating instructions, plans and preparations, background and terrain, reconnaissance, communication, operations, enemy reaction, engineer activities, captured materials, relations with natives, the recapitulation of casualties, commendations, awards, and decorations, conclusions, credit for success, and lessons learned.

Krueger, Walter, 1881-1967

George B. Quillen '27 Scrapbook

  • US TxAM-C 260
  • Collection
  • 1924-1927

This scrapbook belonged to George B. Quillen and contains materials from his time at A&M college from 1924-1927.

Quillen, George B.

George R.R. Martin Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000004
  • Collection

This collection consists of the personal papers, manuscripts, memorabilia, and other associational material of science fiction and fantasy author George R.R. Martin.

Martin, George R.R.

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