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William Clark Manuscript

  • TxAM-CRS 214
  • Coleção
  • 1857

This collection consists of Clark's original, handwritten manuscript of "A Trip Across the Plains in 1857" which was published in "The Iowa Journal of History and Politics" as an article, and a xerox copy of a handwritten transcription of the manuscript, due to its age.

Robert Duncan Milne Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000261
  • Coleção
  • 1879-1889

This collection consists of a group of thirty issues of The Argonaut (1879-1889) containing twenty-three science-fiction stories by Robert Duncan Milne, some in two or three parts. References to "Moskowitz" indicate his edition of eleven stories by Milne, Into the Sun (West Kingston, RI: Donald M. Grant, Publisher, 1980). Eighteen of the stories in this lot were not published in Moskowitz's edition and have never been reprinted, to the best of our knowledge.

The time period covered in this lot is 1879 to 1889. The Argonaut was generally printed on good, non-pulpy paper and, barring abuse, remains in good condition and can be handled with due care without fear of crumbling paper. The Argonaut was a weekly literary newspaper published in San Francisco starting in 1878 and running well into the 20th century. It contained political commentary as well as departmental reviews of books, drama, food, fashion, etc. Ambrose Bierce wrote weekly columns during the first two and a half years of its existence. The editors had a penchant for weird and fantastic fiction and published such material by W. C. Morrow, Emma Frances Dawson, Robert Duncan Milne and a host of other minor authors, as well as offering translations of European material in this vein. Milne was evidently popular among The Argonaut readers, for his stories are often featured on the front page.

Sem título

Edward Everett Papers

  • US TxAM-C C000024
  • Coleção
  • 1846-1906

This collection dating from 1846 to 1906 (bulk: 1846-1847) consists chiefly of handwritten letters, journal entries, a memoir, a proof copy of a report from the U. S. Secretary of War on Army operations in Texas and on the Rio Grande during the Mexican War (1846-1848), as well as plans, maps and nine hand-colored copies of lithographic engravings drawn by Everett, which vividly chronicle southwest Texas cultural as well as military history during the late1840s.

Series 1, Letters (1847-1863), mainly handwritten in ink by Edward Everett to his brother, Samuel W. Everett, from 1846-1847, while Everett was serving in San Antonio de Bexar with the U. S. Army during the Mexican War. A few letters from other correspondents pertain to Everett's disability and eventual official discharge from the Army. Three letters written in the period 1852-1863 are about business or from family members.

Series 2, Journal and Memoir (1846-1899) contains three sets of journal entries for Sept. 1846-Jan. 1847. All are handwritten in ink on loose sheets of paper. The memoir, also handwritten in ink, on machine-ruled paper measuring about 8 x 5 inches, covers the years 1846-1848, with additional material added and dated, on at least one page, with 1899. This memoir is edited in pencil by Everett, evidently for publication, since one note suggests that the memoir was donated in 1899 to the Quincy Historical Society, later known as The Illinois Historical Society. The memoir was actually published, at least part, or possibly all of it, under the title "Military Experience," in Transactions of the Illinois Historical Society for 1905.

Series 3, Engravings, Maps, and Plans (ca. 1846-1849) includes nine copies of lithographed illustrations drawn by Edward Everett and engraved by C. B Graham Lithographers in Washington, D.C. The engravings were to be published in a report on U.S. Army operations in Texas during the Mexican War. A proof copy of this 67-page report, titled Report of the Secretary of War, communicating ... the Operations of the Army of the United States in Texas and the Adjacent Mexican states on the Rio Grande (31st Congress, 1st Session, Senate. Executive Document 32), published in 1850, is annotated throughout by Everett in pencil. For this publication Everett was at least responsible for eight illustrations: seven engravings of the San Antonio de Bexar area, including the Alamo church, as well as locations in Mexico; a plan of the ruined Alamo as it was in 1846, before being renovated according to Everett's direction, as a U. S. Army supply depot and workshops.

Engravings include nine copies of the lithographed prints. Notations made in ink on the separate prints, and on p. [4] of the proof copy of the published government report, indicate that: illustrations numbered for publication 2, 3-6 were engraved from original drawings made by Everett; those numbered 1, 7-8 were engraved from drawings made by Everett based on pencil sketches by other individuals, particularly no. 1 titled "Watch Tower Near Monclova," which was drawn by Everett from a sketch by Lieutenant McDowell of the U.S. Army.

Everett's proofs of the lithographic prints have all been exquisitely hand-tinted, in contrast to the severe black-and-white reproductions in the printed report. Of the nine hand-colored prints, two are duplicates of two illustrations, one titled "Church Near Monclova," and the other "Watch Tower Near Monclova." These identical prints are each hand-colored in two versions, apparently to represent the depicted buildings' appearances during the daytime, as well as at dusk or sunset.

Maps include one copy of a published map, possibly also by Everett, though it has been attributed to Josiah Gregg, which also appeared in the 1850 Army Operations report, titled "Map Showing the Route of the Arkansas Regiment from Shreveport La. to San Antonio de Bexar Texas," which is annotated with a penciled in route drawn from San Antonio to Austin, and a town location labeled "New Braunsfels." Also included are two manuscript versions of a map by Edward Everett, one copy titled "Plan of the Vicinity of Austin and San Antonio, Texas."

Plans are represented by two copies of an illustration drawn by Everett for the 1849 Army operations report showing plans of the Alamo before the renovation, titled "Plans of the Ruins of the Alamo near San Antonio De Bexar, 1846." Also present is one manuscript plan, titled "Plan of San Antonio de Bexar, Texas, 1848," which is labeled as "Drawn from recollection by E. E." The legend states that locations number 1-5 on the plan show, for instance, the spot near the Plaza in town where Everett received his disabling gunshot wound in the leg, the Hospital where he convalesced, and the Quartermaster's Office, to which he was assigned to work after being declared disabled from active service in the field.

A handwritten loose-leaf page kept with the proof copy of the report is titled "Index to Col. Hughes Report," and lists subject divisions and page numbers, though these divisions are not present in the published report by Hughes.

Thus Everett's accounts of frontline actions in the Mexican War mainly rely on reports from occasional volunteer soldiers or scouts, or Mexican nationals, returning back to Texas from the front lines of battle in Mexico. As much as he is able, however, Everett produces very detailed accounts of the various battles and skirmishes in and around the Texas-Mexico border, including battles at Monterrey, Saltillo, San Luis, Camargo, Buena Vista, Vera Cruz, and Tampico, recording a large number of casualties on both sides.

Of particular interest is Everett's extensive first-hand description of the ruins of the Alamo, and how it was converted for U.S. Army use as a military headquarters, according to plans drawn up by Everett. He deplores the vandalism already wreaked by relic seekers and stressed the respect shown to the mission church by the U. S. Army restorers, who refused to plunder it for building stone but instead merely cleaned away the debris. In the process, skeletons were uncovered, which Everett assumes to be from the time of the siege and Battle of the Alamo in 1836. Everett's accounts of frontier life in the rather rambunctious confines of San Antonio, complete with ambushes, shootouts, rough and ready court trials, and various local characters are often riveting.

Everett also pictures the moods and attitudes of the soldiers toward a variety of issues. Everett describes their arduous marches, unsavory living conditions, often dire medical care, and the cruel climate tormenting them. Having been left behind in San Antonio with all the stores rejected by the army, which had proceeded on into Mexico, Everett's men were faced with nursing broken down mules and horses back to usefulness, salvaging wagon parts from several damaged ones to make a serviceable one, and generally, trying to make do with what could be had in the vicinity, or easily transported from the Quartermaster at New Orleans.

According to Everett, communications on the Texas frontier often proceeded through "solitary express riders." He describes Mexican culture co-existing with "the Indians" and their horse-stealing. He also gives an excellent but pejorative account of the Texas Rangers and their activities, calling them desperados. Everett describes Mexican Generals Santa Anna, Torrejón, and Woll, the exceedingly unpopular U. S. Army Colonel Churchill, officers George W. Hughes, 1st Lieutenant W. B. Franklin, 2nd Lieutenant F. T. Bryan, General Zachary Taylor ("Old Rough and Ready"), General Winfield Scott, and General James Morgan, Captain J. H. Prentiss, Brigadier General John E. Wool, Major General Worth, Captain James Harvey Ralston, Captain L. Sitgreaves, as well as Edward Everett's own two brothers Charles Everett and Samuel W. Everett (Sam).

Full of absorbing narrative and elusive details often lost in larger historical works, the content of Everett's narratives and letters may be summed up in his own words from the handwritten memoir: "Mine is not a tale of battles, or of the movements of great armies, but the details will show some of the hardships and vicissitudes of a soldier's life, the exposure to which causes a greater sacrifice of life than that ensuing from wounds of death received from the enemy."

Sem título

Yates Stirling Jr. Diary of the Commander of the U.S.S. Von Steuben Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C 318
  • Coleção
  • 1918-1928

This collection includes the manuscript diaries of the commander of the U.S.S. Von Steuben, 317 pages.12 mo (6X4 inches), original calf, worn; a few minor creases and tears, lacking the last 7 leaves (not part of diary proper).  Vp, January 1 to September 7, 1918; April 8 to June 21, 1919; and circa 1928. There are two bound diary volumes and one typescript entitled "Battle Between the U.S.S. Von Steuben and German Submarine", June 18, 1818.

Sem título

Arthur C. Clarke - "Jupiter Five" Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000254
  • Coleção
  • 1953

This collection consists of the original typescript of Arthur C. Clarke's short story, "Jupiter Five", written in 1951 and first published in the May 1953 issue of the magazine IF: Worlds of Science Fiction. This typescript is the setting copy for the magazine publication and has been copy-edited by editor Larry T. Shaw and the author. It also includes two layout sheets with design notes and paste-in illustrations.

Sem título

Arkham House Collection (August Derleth)

  • TxAM-CRS C000195
  • Coleção
  • 1930-1953

The Arkham House Collection consists of correspondence from August Derleth to Howard Wandrei. Derleth, a writer, founded Arkham House to publish and keep in print the work of Howard Phillips Lovecraft, a friend and fellow writer. Lovecraft died in 1937; for the next two years Derleth tried unsuccessfully to find a publisher for Lovecraft's writings. Using money from prepaid orders and the personal investment of Donald Wandrei (brother of Howard Wandrei), Derleth founded Arkham House in 1939. Arkham House published science fiction works by Lovecraft and other writers such as Algernon Blair, Clark Ashton Smith and Henry S. Whitehead.

In his letters to fellow science-fiction writer Howard Wandrei, August Derleth writes about his publishing efforts at Arkham House, his own writing career and the details of his personal life. His letters also mention other authors and publishing houses. The letters date from 1930-1953; most letters are accompanied by the original stamped envelopes.

Sem título

Tom Godwin "You Created Us" Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000266
  • Coleção
  • 1954

This collection consists of one typed manuscript (17 leaves) by Godwin, for his 1955 story "You Created Us".

Sem título

Theodore Sturgeon Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000235
  • Coleção
  • 1954

This collection consists of an advance copy (bound unpaged galley proofs) of the first edition, first state; and an advance copy (bound unpaged galley proofs) of the first edition, second state, of Sturgeon's 1953 novel More Than Human.

The proofs represent the first state of the text without Sturgeon's extensive last-minute changes made at the publisher's office. A handwritten signed note by Sturgeon dated August 1954 on the inside front cover reads: "A few hours before 'More Than Human' went to press, the author felt a profound dissatisfaction with the last section. Working in the corner of a busy office at his publisher's, he rewrote the final portion. This is, as far as he knows, the only copy extant of the book before these changes were made. It is donated, with the author's warmest good wishes, to the World Science Fiction Convention of 1954, at San Francisco."

The revisions to the galleys were made on leaves 16, 120, 136, 139, and 144-145 and consisted mostly of insertions of new copy, ranging from about 150 words in one case to about 1500 in another (at the story's conclusion).

The proofs are accompanied by a signed letter, dated August 25, 1954, from Sturgeon (signed "Ted") to "Les" (probably Lester Cole, co-chairman of the convention) on Sturgeon's stationery, with an autograph postscript. This is the cover letter sent with the proof, in which Sturgeon explains why he will not be able to attend the 1954 convention due to a death in the family. He expresses sincere regret and names those to whom he would like to have his greetings conveyed, including "the six (at least) X's. These last are the handful, among all the wonderful people there, whom [sic] I haven't met yet but would discover and have for lifelong friends if only I could be there."

Sem título

Murray Leinster "Honeymoon on Dlecka" Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000263
  • Coleção
  • 1955

This collection consists of the typed manuscript (21 leaves) for Leinster's short story "Honeymoon on Dlecka", published in Fantastic Universe, July 1955.

Sem título

Alfred Elton Van Vogt Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000180
  • Coleção
  • 1949-1956; Undated

This collection consists of materials relating to the 1956 A. E. Van Vogt novel Empire of the Atom, including the original typescript, galleys, and correspondence related to the book's publication and review.

Sem título

Samuel Erson Asbury Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 33
  • Coleção
  • 1872-1960

The Samuel Erson Asbury Papers consist of research materials, correspondence, mainly original contemporary letters and copies of the older historical correspondence, Asbury's writings and copies of state and national documents, held in eight boxes and one map case drawer occupying approximately twelve linear feet of shelf space. Asbury's broad range of interests is reflected in the variety of topics contained in these papers. Foremost among them are the files of correspondence, historical documents, articles and research notes concerning various aspects of Texas history.

Also included in the Asbury papers are articles, short stories, essays, plays, poetry, and a Texas Revolution opera written by Asbury; research notes and correspondence on the cultivation of roses and the growing of plants without soil; articles written about Asbury; correspondence with family members; general correspondence; and photographs of Asbury, his family and friends, and North Carolina A & M College.

Sem título

Bernard Gordon Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000170
  • Coleção
  • 1963-01-17

This collection consists of a domestic version of the export script dated January 17, 1963, for the British science fiction movie The Day of the Triffids (1962), written by Gordon and based on the famous 1951 novel by John Wyndham.

Sem título

Mildred Watkins Mears Papers

  • US TxAM-C 192
  • Coleção
  • 1946-1963

This collection consists of some correspondence, a significant number of mostly typed manuscript drafts, both published and unpublished, and a printer's galley for her book, Coryell County Scrapbook, published in 1963 by Texian Press of Waco, Texas. Also present are a few newspaper clippings, as well as handwritten and typed research notes for her published book.

The manuscript drafts reveal an engaging blend of scholarship, personal recollection, and anecdotal history chronicling the development of Coryell county from when the area was part of Coahuila, Mexico, through to its formal organization as a county in the state of Texas in 1854. Included is an account of the growth of Fort Hood as a military base in the early 1960s.

Stories are cited from early twentieth-century newspapers recounting Indian skirmishes with pioneering settlers, deeds of cattle rustlers and trail drivers, as well as events surrounding prohibition and various political rivalries. The early days of Fort Gates, now Gatesville, and the later development of Camp Hood, now Fort Hood, one of the nation's largest military installations, are described. Statistical tables and records present expenditures for, and descriptions of, buildings, jails, courthouses, prominent homes, banks, and businesses in Coryell county.

Interspersed among the political and economic accounts of the county's progress are more personal stories of weddings, births, parties, church events, legendary horses, dogs, local heroes, and even the county's centennial celebration in 1954. Mears' relatively unadorned narrative describes in some detail the increasing social, economic, and political prosperity and influence, as well as the setbacks, of Coryell County. Mears' work brings to life frontier Texas culture during the late nineteenth and early to mid-twentieth century.

Sem título

Ellen Schulz Quillin Manuscripts

  • US TxAM-C 95
  • Coleção
  • 1928-1964

This collection contains two manuscripts written by Ellen D. Schulz Quillin. The first, "Texas Wild Flowers. a Popular Account of the Common Wild Flowers of Texas.", was published in 1928 by Laidlaw Brothers (Chicago, IL), and the second, "Texas Cacti: A Popular and Scientific Account of the Cacti Native to Texas", was published in 1930 by the Texas Academy of Science and written with Robert Runyon.

The manuscript for "Texas Wild Flowers. a Popular Account of the Common Wild Flowers of Texas." consists of two bound volumes, typed with handwritten edits and notes, and both contain a title page handwritten in graphite, dated and initialed by Ellen (December 23, 1955). The inscription in Part I reads, "Original Texas Wild Flowers manuscript. Of no value to anyone else. Kept for reference to revision, if I should get to it". and in Part II, the inscription slightly changes with the last sentence reading "Kept for reference in case of revision".

The first volume, Part I (pages 1-337), has a second note by Ellen handwritten in ink, dated October 20, 1963, in which she talks about the book being published, the revisions she wanted to make after it becoming know the book was out of bring in 1959 [Part 2 state 1939], and never got around to due to her work in writing "History of the Museum" in 5 volumes and resigning in 1960.

The second volume, Part II (pages 338-640), also has a handwritten ink note from October 20, 1963, however, the inscription reads "Presented to Peggy C. Owens, College Station, Texas to use in any way she can as Texas Wildflowers has not been replaced since it became out of print in 1939 [Part I states 1959] - used copies are generally not available - and the last used copy I saw advertised in a California catalogue was $27.50 - a prohibitive price".

The second manuscript in this collection, "Texas Cacti: A Popular and Scientific Account of the Cacti Native to Texas", is held within a Weston Paper box with an address label for Mrs. Peggy C. Owens affixed to the outside. The manuscript itself is bound, typed with handwritten edits and notes, and original photographs (95 pages total). Also found within are a few publications that were used for reference.

Contained within the front cover are four documents, two are keys for illustrations, one for illustrations from "Succulents" by van Laren from paintings made in Amsterdam by Messrs. C. Rol, J. Voerman and H. Rol, and the second unidentified. The third is an announcement for the release of "Texas Wild Flowers: A Popular Account of the Common Wild Flowers of Texas by Ellen D. Schulz Quillin, M. S." with an overall description of the book, an excerpt from the book on the origin of Texas bluebonnets and two reprints from Texas newspapers of articles announcing Ellen's new book in June and July of 1928. The fourth document is a note handwritten in ink, originally paper clipped to the front cover, dated April 21, 1964, reading "To Peggy Owens - One of my most Precious possessions. Ellen S. Quillin". Also noted in graphite below the original note is "send vols 1 & 2" by Ellen, May 12, 1964. On the first page in the top right corner is another handwritten note in ink by Ellen dating April 21, 1964, "To Peggy Owens - Compliments of the author".

Sem título

Jon Manchip White Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000174
  • Coleção
  • 1965

This collection consists of the release dialogue script of the 1965 Paramount film Crack in the World starring Dana Andrews as Dr. Steven Sorenson, who plans to tap the geothermal energy of the Earth's interior by means of a thermonuclear device detonated deep within the Earth. Despite dire warnings by fellow scientist Ted Rampion (Kieron Moore), Sorenson proceeds with the experiment after secretly learning that he is terminally ill. This experiment causes a crack to form and grow within the earth's crust, which threatens to split the earth in two if it is not stopped in time. The screenplay was written by White and Julian Halevy.

Sem título

Kate Adele Hill Papers

  • TxAM-CRS C000025
  • Coleção
  • 1930-1965

This collection contains the personal papers of Kate Adele Hill during her time as an employee of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Included are correspondence, speeches, clippings, articles, photos about extension work, pioneer women in Texas, demonstration work, and agriculture.

Sem título

John Q. Anderson Papers

  • TxAM-CRS 19
  • Coleção
  • 1953-1966

This collection consists of term papers, course handouts, folklore fieldnotes, news clippings, a report, a document, maps, photographs, materials about folksingers, pamphlets on wildlife, materials about vaudeville and North Carolina, the information given to Dr. Anderson on Texas, correspondence, and information on The Texas Folklore Society and The John A. Lomax Folklore Society.

The majority of the material is from Dr. John Q. Anderson's students at Texas A&M. Dr. Anderson assigned his students to write term papers on folklore from many locales, including Texas. Because Dr. Anderson felt that some of these student papers were so exceptional, he collected, edited, and had them published in a book he titled, Texas Lore: A Collection of Student Papers on Texas Folklore. As additional information on some of the term papers, some of the students gave Dr. Anderson information on North Carolina, and Billy Arlington and Co. Dr. Anderson also requested that his students collect information on folklore by interviewing people and recording this information in fieldnotes. The information was gathered and is represented in the collection on topics including folk medicine, games, children's lore, folk beliefs, folk sayings, proverbs, rhymes, riddles, tree and plant lore, and Aggie lore.

Along with interviews and fieldnotes contributed by the students, many news clippings were collected, mostly relating to Texas and pertaining to people, places, folk medicine, folk singers, folk games, folklore book reviews, anthropology, superstitions, magic, and etymology. Also present is one document on folk medicine, an article on folksinger Joan Baez, a few articles on certain Texas counties, and special editions of some Texas newspapers.

Other materials include correspondence between Dr. John Q. Anderson and the Texas Folklore Society or the John A. Lomax Society, and with people interested in folklore. There is also information about meetings and conferences to be held by the Texas Folklore Society, including a program that Dr. Anderson sponsored at Texas A&M for the John A. Lomax Society.

Sem título

Anne McCaffrey Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000197
  • Coleção
  • 1969

This collection consists of the original manuscript for McCaffrey's novella The Partnered Ship (1969), which was included as the concluding chapter in her famed 1969 novel The Ship Who Sang. The manuscript (typed 70 leaves) is signed by McCaffrey and has multiple handwritten edits.

Sem título

Robert L. Dawson French Collection

  • TxAM-CRS 411
  • Coleção
  • circa 1570-circa 1970

This collection consists of manuscripts, typescripts, printed items, correspondence, official documents, and publications from the French seventeenth to twentieth centuries. Authors and addressees include many personalities prominent in French history but also many ordinary individuals.

Sem título

Arthur C. Clarke - Playboy Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000157
  • Coleção
  • 1960-1971

This collection consists of materials related to Arthur C. Clarke's sales of stories and other pieces to Playboy Magazine. The collection includes a group of 27 typed letters and 7 autograph letters, mainly between Clarke and editor A. G. Spectorksy, internal Playboy memoranda, and correspondence from Playboy. Also included are typescripts (marked as setting copy) for 4 short works of fiction and 8 nonfiction pieces by Clarke.

Sem título

Otto Binder Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000204
  • Coleção
  • 1929-1971

This collection consists of typescripts of several of Binder's novels with most including the author's corrections and accompanying carbons, and a number of short stories with most corrected including carbons and in some cases tearsheets from the magazines in which the stories initially appeared, corrected and with continuation sheets for expansion into full-length books.

In addition, there are close to 300 business and personal letters, photographs, postcards, and other files including broadcasting projects, non-fiction articles, letters and critiques from literary agents and publishers, materials on Space World, and several folders of unfinished manuscripts. Unusual "picture cards" featuring text and photographs on postcards are included.

Excluding duplicate carbons, letters, etc., there are approximately 2,300 pages (mostly 11 x 8.5-inches) of typescript with a total of about 575,000 words. Many of Binder's letters are on letters received or on the backs of manuscript or script fragments.

Sem título

Barry N. Malzberg Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000202
  • Coleção
  • 1972

This collection contains the typed manuscript (7 leaves with a 2 leaf blurb), with handwritten edits, of Barry Malzberg's 1973 story "Isaiah", which was first published in the issue of Fantastic Science Fiction and Fantasy Stories.

A crossed-out date on the last page gives the date of composition to be December 20, 1972.

Sem título

Glen Cook Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000216
  • Coleção
  • 1973

This collection consists of the typed manuscript with handwritten edits of Cook's 1973 short story "The Night of Dreadful Silence". Also included is one blurb with the cover format.

Sem título

Gordon Eklund Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000194
  • Coleção
  • 1973

This collection consists of the manuscript for Eklund's 1973 story "The Stuff of Time", which was published in the September 1973 issue of Fantastic Stories.

Sem título

David R. Bunch Manuscript

  • TxAM-CRS C000220
  • Coleção
  • 1973

This collection consists of the typescript for Bunch's short story, "Moment of Truth in Suburb Junction", which was published in Fantastic, in September 1973. The 10-page typescript has handwritten edits and includes a note from Fantastic editor Ted White and a one-leaf blurb.

Sem título

Janet Fox Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000191
  • Coleção
  • 1973

This collection consists of the manuscript for Fox's short story A Witch in Time, published in September 1973. The manuscript is typed, 22 pages with an additional 2-page blurb.

Sem título

Alexei Panshin Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000189
  • Coleção
  • 1968-1973

This collection consists of several manuscripts of Panshin's work, including his 1968 novel The Thurb Revolution and his serialized novel The Son of Black Morca (1973, photocopies). Also included is a set of galleys for Panshin's Masque World (1969).

Sem título

Karl T. Pflock "AFC" Manuscript

  • US TxAM-C C000255
  • Coleção
  • 1973

This collection consists of the manuscript with handwritten edits of the story "AFC", by Karl T. Pflock, published in Fantasticin September 1973, accompanied by a typewritten blurb.

Sem título

Ted White Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000230
  • Coleção
  • 1973

This collection includes the typescript for an editorial by White for the September 1973 issue of Fantastic, and some 14 pieces of editorial correspondence, undated.

Sem título

Wilson Tucker Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000185
  • Coleção
  • 1953-1954; 1974

This collection contains the typed manuscript for Tucker's 1954 novel Wild Talent, as well as the original typescript and page proofs for Tucker's 1974 novel Ice and Iron.

Sem título

Jack Williamson Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000171
  • Coleção
  • 1975

This collection consists of 81 leaves of uncorrected galley proofs for Williamson's 1975 collection The Early Williamson.

Sem título

Scott A. Cupp Academic Paper

  • US TxAM-C C000260
  • Coleção
  • 1975

This collection contains "The Fantasy of Love in the Works of Cordwainer Smith", an academic paper by Scott A. Cupp. 10 p., 1975.

Sem título

Charles Levy Civil Rights Collection

  • US TxAM-C C000013
  • Coleção
  • 1863-1975

This collection contains nearly 1000 items related to the civil rights movement from 1955-1975. The early part of this collection (1955-67) formed the basic research for Levy's book Voluntary Servitude, Whites in the Negro Movement, (New York: Appleton-Century, 1968). The collection includes hundreds of pages of writings, publications, bulletins, internal memos, broadsides, hand-printed magazines, etc. Prominent figures of the civil rights and revolutionary movements, organizations, and committees are covered in the collection. The collection also includes two photographs of President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act with Rev. Martin L. King, Jr. and other luminaries of the civil rights movement.

Lester Del Rey Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000234
  • Coleção
  • circa 1975

This collection consists of galleys of uncorrected proofs for Del Rey's 1975 short story collection The Early Del Rey.

Sem título

Robert McKay Collection

  • TxAM-CRS C000240
  • Coleção
  • 1976

This collection consists of the uncorrected proofs (44 sheets) for McKay's 1976 novel Skean.

Sem título

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